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Buy it for SURE

Buy it for SURE
A gorgeous display and packed with features and  sensors. But there’s one major catch. Several   months after its release, does it still make sense  to buy the Galaxy Watch 4? Here’s our full review. Goedendag we’re DHRME: Dangerous  Hobbies Require Many Expletives Right off the bat, let’s talk about 3 things the  Watch 4 doesn’t do, so you don’t have to waste   your time watching the rest of this video. Give  us a thumbs up if you like saving time as well.  Alright, Number 1. The Watch 4 cannot be paired to  an iPhone. There’s no Galaxy Wear app to be found   on the App Store. So if you’re all about that  Apple sauce, we ain’t judging, but look elsewhere. Ok so you’re still here..  Number 2. The Watch 4 does not support Google  Assistant yet. They promised it after launch but   it’s nowhere to be seen. And yes, there  is a risky-hacky way of sideloading it   but we’re not going to recommend  that to you guys for obvious reasons. Ok wow, you’re still watching..  And Number 3. The Watch 4 cannot be  used to mea

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blood pres

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or ECG   unless you have a Samsung phone. We  don’t like it but it is what it is!  You’re still here? Great! Now that  we’ve gotten that out of the way,   let’s get started with the health and fitness  features you get, because you get a lot! If   you’re not buying this smartwatch for this  then skip ahead using the chapters down below. We’ve come to expect basic step counting ...
buy it for sure
from wearables for a while now. But beyond   that - the Watch 4 is quite advanced with its  health & fitness feature set. The fanciest   feature the Watch 4 comes with is called Body  Composition which helps you mea

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your body fat   and skeletal muscle by holding your fingers down  on the two buttons. This worked flawlessly when we   first got the watch but lately we just can’t get  it to work. We’re not

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if this is a software,   hardware or a skin pigment limitation,  but it’s something to keep in mind. Sleep tracking however is something that works  more consistently than the amount of sleep we   actually get. Besides seeing how long you’ve slept  for, you can see a bunch of other data like how   long you actually slept for, how many calories you  burnt and whether your dreams are going to come   true. Ok, maybe not that last one. Below all that  information you can even see a sleep chart and   duration of your different sleep stages. So you  know exactly when and for how long you were awake,   in REM, light or deep sleep. This then results  in a sleep score and advice regarding how you can   improve your sleep. I clearly don’t get enough  deep sleep which is restorative sleep - so I’ll   need to work on that. And because you wear the  Watch while tracking your sleep it can do two   more things. It can mea

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your blood oxygen  during sleep and whether you snore or not.   So if you’re still in denial about...
buy it for sure
being a snorer,  this feature might settle it once and for all.   Remember though that it uses the microphone of  your paired phone to listen to your snoring and   record audio samples for you to listen back  to. I’m proud to report that I do not snore,   at least most of the time. Remember that  turning on both of these features will   use up more battery, but does give you  everything sleep tracking has to offer. You can also mea

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your heart rate on the  watch and set it to either continuously,   every 10 mins or manually. The frequency  here does obviously affect battery life,   so keep that in mind. We didn’t quite find  it necessary to have frequent heart rate   mea

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ments on and that’s why we  set it on manual. Even on manual,   heart rate mea

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ment kicks in when you  exercise. How much more heart rate data do   you need? But more on that later. Blood oxygen  mea

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ments are done automatically so you can’t   change the frequency but you can decide if  you’d like it to mea

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it during sleep or not. Another piece of health tracking is monitoring  stress, which the watch does using heart rate   variability. Again, you can set this to mea

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  continuously or manually. In terms of reliability   it’s hard to tell. It mea

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d certain moments as  being high stress, but when thinking back to that   moment it didn’t feel like I was stressed.  But that’s maybe how stress works - hits   you when you least...
buy it for sure
expect it. And here’s a sudden  request to hit like and subscribe to the channel.   You didn’t expect that either did you?  Don’t get stressed. Back to the watch,   it was initially fun to have stress monitoring  continuously on but we noticed that we barely   went into the app to check stress levels and  it didn’t alert us when stress was too high.   So we ended up changing this to manual. Added  benefit here is the gain in battery life.   You can also track things like your food and water  intake and it gives you an indication how much you   should be eating or drinking based on your gender,  ages, height, weight and activity level. This   target for caloric intake can be adjusted in the  app if you want to. Adding food from the watch is   pretty basic though. You can select a meal such  as breakfast, afternoon snack, dinner etc. and   the amount of calories. That’s it. In the Health  app you get a heap of foods to select from and the   ability to select portions and see nutritional  values as well. Some foods have specific brands   but tend to be very US oriented - look at the list  for peanut butter you can select from! In terms of   water intake, the target is set to 8 glasses  per day but you can adjust this from the app.   Adding water intake is the same in the app or the  watch. Both of these features were fun to try out   but it wasn’t something we used, but if you feel  like caloric intake and hydration is a...
concern,   it’s handy to have this onboard. Do note that if  you have a caloric deficit you’re working on, for   example, for weight loss then it’s unfortunately  not so easy to see how much your calorie burn   and intake is. So you’ll need to do some manual  calculations to get to that deficit number. And speaking of activity levels, let’s move on  to the fitness tracking options you get. You   can choose from a long list of workouts.  Beyond basic fitness data like duration,   calories burnt and heart rate,  the Watch 4 will record slightly   different types of fitness data depending  on the workout you choose. For example,   if you go for a run it will map out the route  and show you information about your pace,   cadence, maximum oxygen intake but also advanced  running metrics. Those advanced running metrics   are great if you want to improve your running  form. I clearly need to work on my contact time,   vertical oscillation and stiffness. For certain workouts like lateral raises,   bench presses, burpees etc. you get the option  to set a target in terms of reps and sets   and the watch can track those reps for you  based on your wrist movement. This is very cool   and useful for those of us who can’t  multitask by working out and counting!  If you can count, you’re  not working out hard enough! As you’re working on looking and feeling  great with those health features - how does   the watch look on your...
wrist? We have  the Galaxy Watch 4 in the 40mm black   version with a sport band and without LTE.  Now let’s break that last sentence up. You have the Watch 4 and Watch 4 Classic - the  major difference being the rotating bezel that you   get on the Classic. We haven’t tested that one but  we’re convinced that the bezel is extremely useful   for scrolling through the interface. The Watch 4  has a digital bezel meaning you can swipe around   the edge of the display to scroll as well. Not  very intuitive so we find ourselves scrolling like   normal people. The Watch 4 comes in 40 AND 44mm  whereas the Classic has a 42 and 46mm version.   And the Watch 4 comes in 4 case color  options which is two more than the classic.   Apart from the color of the cases the  materials are also different since the   classic is made with stainless steel whereas  the watch 4 is made with aluminium. Aluminium   is lighter than steel but it is less  durable, so something to keep in mind.   We prefer the lightweight in a watch and we have  a few minor dings on the watch case and lugs. Both watches come with the same selection of  watch straps from Samsung but since the watch has   ordinary lugs you can swap them out for normal  watch straps too. Thanks Samsung for not making   this a proprietary thing. And finally either  watch model comes with or without 4G LTE - so   if you need that connectivity independent  of your phone then LTE might be useful...
else   we’d suggest you save your money. In terms  of display they both come with a beautiful   super AMOLED display with 530 pixels per  inch. And this is a huge selling point for   this watch - extremely crisp display and great  visibility outdoors. And speaking of outdoors,   both sport an IP68 rating against water and  dust as well as a MIL-STD-810g and 5ATM. We   can attest to its durability in the rain and heavy  sweating but we haven’t gone swimming with it yet. In terms of looks though we went for the Watch4  because it’s just so much sleeker looking than   the Classic and easily slides under any shirt  cuff. The Classic costs more, is bulkier with that   rotating bezel and has that standard smartwatch  look that’s been around for several years now. The   watch wears comfortably on your wrist and doesn’t  feel uncomfortable in bed either. That’s not what   she said. The sport strap we have comes with  enough notches to get a good fit. And remember,   you should have your watch behind your  wrist bone for sensors to work properly.   With that gorgeous display we mentioned and  all the built in health and fitness sensors,   comes the biggest drawback of this watch. You’ve  probably guessed it - the battery life! In the   beginning this wasn’t so bad and we got around  1.5 - 2 days of battery life with the always on   display and sensors monitoring continuously. But  after just a few months we noticed it has...
become a   1 day watch. So just enough for a normal day with  sleep tracking. But, a big butt! We tested this   by tracking a 2 hour walk and using Google Maps  on the watch for a total of 30mins. I took the   watch off the charger at 9AM that day and being  back home around 7PM it had less than 5% left. So   I ended up turning the time-only mode on to save  battery for the rest of the evening. Unfortunately   not enough juice to track my sleep that night.  So if you’re a “desk diver” kind of watch user.   Google the term if you don’t know it ;) Then this watch will be great for the odd   workout tracking and a little bit of notifications  and maps. But if you use it a lot, as in more than   an hour of fitness tracking and other features  requiring the sensors or GPS, then it won’t last   you the full day. So lowering the frequency  or changing the sensors to manual for heart   rate and stress, as well as turning off the always  on display will get you a little under 1.5 days. As you struggle not to make this smartwatch  look like an expensive bracelet on your wrist,   there are a couple of things you need to know  about the ecosystem. As we said at the beginning,   the Watch4 doesn’t work with an iPhone. So  droids only, no apples. And with android we   mean either Samsung or any other android phone.  There aren’t too many special features we’ve   come across that only work with a Samsung phone  apart from the Body...
Composition or ECG feature.   But since we’re talking Samsung, there is  some neat integration with the Watch4 if you   have Samsung earbuds such as the Galaxy Buds 2 or  Buds Live that we have over here. You can see the   battery level on the buds, toggle noise cancelling  and block touches. But most importantly the buds   can seamlessly switch between your watch and  Samsung phone. Apple AirPods Handoff anyone? One thing I personally missed from Apple was  Apple Pay and the seamless integration and   support for more banks here in the Netherlands.  What about the Watch4? We’re happy it supports   Google Pay albeit with fewer supported banks  over here. All you need to do is install the   Gpay app and set it up. And while you’re in the  Google Playstore anyway, go ahead and install   gboard. You can respond to messages straight  from the Watch4 either by voice, writing letters   or a keyboard. The reason gboard comes in handy is  if you, like us, love to swipe on keyboards. If,   however, you’re looking to easily upgrade  your voice assistant by downloading an app,   you’re in for a disappointment. That’s right,  on the Watch4 you’re stuck with bloody Bixby.   Well it’s not all bad, it can do the basics  like making calls, setting reminders, timers,   or starting a workout. But you can’t play music  on spotify or youtube music nor can you send   messages. And this is ok, we don’t make use of  voice assistants a...
whole lot. And when we do,   we have our trusted google assistant on  our phones in the neighbourhood anyway. For those moments when we don’t suffer  from separation anxiety with our phones,   it’s useful to get notified of things on your  smartwatch. A big reason for getting one in our   opinion. And the Watch4 delivers here as well.  In the Galaxy Wear companion app you can tweak   settings of the watch including which apps you  want to receive notifications from. Because more   isn’t always better on a tiny screen. The Watch4  is more an extension to your phone than just   notifications but you can make and receive  calls and text messages. You can receive   and respond to WhatsApp messages but you  can’t receive or make WhatsApp call though.   Just to keep in mind. A feature we appreciate in  smartwatches is using it like a remote control.   If music is playing on your phone, you get volume  and track controls on your watch. If you’re on a   phone call you can answer or hang up. If you’ve  got your phone on a tripod you can snap a photo   or start a video by using the Google Camera app.  If you’re navigating with Google Maps you can   follow the route on your watch without taking your  phone out of your pocket. Super useful and badass! Coming back to that gorgeous display we started  this video with. You don’t know what you’ve got   until you don’t. That’s how I felt after using  the Skagen Falster Gen 6 for a...
while and moving   back to the Watch4. And what adds to the eye candy  is the user interface. Android purists may hate it   since it looks quite different to wearOS, but  gone are the days that Samsung makes slow and   clunky skins on top of wearOS. It’s snappy and  easy to use once you get used to the gestures.   For example, the notifications are not to the  bottom of the watch face but to the left of it.   You don’t swipe away notifications by swiping  to the right but swiping up. So those are a few   differences which you might need getting used  to if you come from a pure wearOS smartwatch. Another thing that works nicely with that display  are awesome watch faces. And Samsung shines here   again. They include a whole host of watch faces  which you can either select or customize from   the Galaxy Wear app or on the Watch4 directly.  I personally like the ‘Digital Dashboard’ since   it's clean while showing a lot of information  at the same time, as showing the time. But if   you’re too cool for default watch faces you  can head over to the playstore and download   more. I frequently use the Pixel Minimal Watch  Face when I’m feeling a bit more minimalistic. Now let’s wrap up this  review in a minimalistic way.   Here are reasons to buy or not to  buy the Samsung Galaxy Watch 4: You should buy the Watch4: If you value, value for money;   competitors like the Skagen Falster Gen  6, TicWatch Pro 3 Ultra or Apple...
Watch SE   are 50-100 bucks more. But for the latest prices  check out the links in the description down below.  If you appreciate good design. That crispy looking  screen, sleek and classy form factor and comfort   on the wrist make the Watch4 a desirable  piece of tech to adorn that wrist of yours.  If you appreciate WearOS being  a future proof operation system,   where you get regular security updates  and have access to the Google playstore  If you intend to get healthy and active and  need the extensive health and fitness features You should not buy the Watch4:  If you need decent battery life. It’s fine if you  don’t use the sensors too much. In other words,   you don’t plan to use it a lot for workouts  or navigation. Otherwise, look elsewhere,   or take a charging cable with you everywhere. If you don’t want a small screen which doesn’t   have an easy way to scroll through  the user interface. In this case,   it might be worth getting the Classic version  if you don’t mind the slightly bigger size.  If you’re too attached to your iPhone and  don’t want to switch to an Android phone You’ve been watching another watch  video and we’ve been DHRME. Namaste!