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BUDGET Chevy Big Block Build! - Part 2 of 3 ( long block assembly )

Jun 09, 2021
Oh my god, that's probably too good for me Hello, welcome to the Vice Grip shop, this is

part

two of three of a cheap Chevy big

block

build

in

part

one, we put the short

block

together here today in part two, We are going to place the heads and complete the valve. train the installation and I will show you a common mistake when choosing head gaskets that secondly affects your compression ratio and robs you of some horsepower, as well as the correct way to set the rocker arm geometry and a very quick and easy way configuring the hydraulic system. lifter preload that seems like a lot of work anyway that's just that means digging into whatever come on okay let's jump right into that we're going to start with the head gaskets and I can't tell you how many times I've been to the shop of parts and well, it's probably like 13 or 14, but anyway, I'm in line at the parts store and this guy comes up and yeah, he's

build

ing a hot rod engine for the old Maverick or whatever and I need a head. together and they say, well, just give me whatever is in stock and Getting to the head gasket, we need to understand the compression ratio and how it works.
budget chevy big block build   part 2 of 3 long block assembly
Now I'm not going to go into details. David Freiberger explained this very well once in a side hit, so you can go look for it. If you want the full explanation, but essentially there are a handful of things that affect your compression ratio, whether increasing it or decreasing it, that's going to be the bore, which is the opening of the cylinder here, the stroke, which is the distance the piston travels. up and down the design. of your piston itself a valve relief a plate a flat top or a dome like we have here the combustion chamber of your head this is an old set of camel hump heads here what is this gap here or this is a set of ls heads right here and what is most commonly overlooked is the thickness and diameter of the head gasket, so obviously the smaller that area in the combustion chamber, the greater the compression.
budget chevy big block build   part 2 of 3 long block assembly

More Interesting Facts About,

budget chevy big block build part 2 of 3 long block assembly...

Well a lot of people overlook this and when they buy head gaskets they don't ask what is the inside diameter of the head gasket and what is the compressed thickness when I install it on my engine and that can have a drastic effect whether positive or negative, in the overall compression ratio. Now it's an important step when building an engine and we don't talk about it. In the first step you really need to sit down and design your motor specifically for your build and it's more than just your motor. What am I using the vehicle for?
budget chevy big block build   part 2 of 3 long block assembly
What are the intended purposes? What type of gasoline or fuel do I want to use? 93 e85 and so on that determines your carburetion and many other things or your fuel injection up to your torque converter, your transmission, your rear gears and the weight of your vehicle, everything plays together and you are going to need all that from everyone modes when you select the can axle, but simply put, you'll get a compression number right away at the start of your build. One of those key components is the compressed thickness of the head gasket, now in this particular. engine here with pop-up pistons, my heads, and what I determined was an 18,000 thick head gasket, which is extremely thin.
budget chevy big block build   part 2 of 3 long block assembly
It should be at 9.1 to 1 or very close. This head gasket here when it's compressed is 18,000, it's a steel shim. gasket this is what GM basically uses out of the box, they work great on cast heads now, for example if I were to switch to a forty mil or forty four mil gasket which is pretty common it will drastically affect my compression ratio. I started from a 9.1, which is pretty loose, but for forced induction to be safe, it will take me from there to about an 8.6, which is really slow, so you have to pay close attention to the compressed thickness of the head gasket .
What you should pay close attention to is the bore, this is a 4.280 bore and it fits almost perfectly into the block where the fire ring surrounds the cylinder; however, there are some gaps in the side, so the overall diameter is actually 4.370, so when you calculate your compression, you should calculate that as well. The most important thing is that this ring of fire here does not impede or overlap the cylinder bore, but if it is larger than the bore, you are losing compression, there are many calculators out there. That will help you figure it out. I'm going to put this head gasket on quickly and then I'll come over to you and show you what I'm talking about.
Wow, little devil! Closer here, this ring here is what I call the fire ring and this is what we need to make sure is closest to the actual cylinder bore. See how close it is but not overlapping the hole itself. It is now very common to have these. it comes out like this, that's completely normal, but they take that into consideration when they give you the bore measurement, so although this sounds considerably larger than 4.280, I can't go smaller than this because I don't want this ring of fire. up to my cylinder bore, so now that I have them on, let's talk about the heads for a minute and then we'll go ahead and install the ones other than the crank and connecting rods, in the other area where we could save a huge amount of money. money on this. build and keep us down and the

budget

zone is in the heads and knowing that I was already limiting myself with the original rotating

assembly

there other than the pistons, I built these 049s that I had on the shelf and these are one of a handful of Block Heads big Chevy that are quite sought after, there are a lot of them out there, but there are also a lot of people looking for them and if you just upgrade them with the current hardware, they work very, very well, especially in a naturally aspirated world, but again powerfully.
The induction doesn't really lose much performance because I'm going to have to keep it in tune if I want to keep the crank alive. These here have been upgraded with 172 2190 stainless steel valves. We have rotator eliminators here. Normally there's a stack here and these springs sit higher at high revs or they get stuck coiling, that spring could jump, we've removed it here so they don't walk, we have balance springs, we have 10 degree guards. harp bolts and we have 3 8 guide plates, of course, they've all been cleaned and all that, so what I have here, all in machine work and parts, I have 810 on these heads in that value right there.
These are built absolutely specifically for this camshaft and to me that's worth at least 100 bucks. Screw these things together and run them. You can now find Jackie Chan heads in Evil Bay or on the jungle website for Big Block Chevy. I just looked at $13 1400 but you have no idea how accurate the castings are, you definitely don't know what type of valves you are going to have and you will most likely be changing your valve springs to match the installed height or spring pressure or your max. lift it up to your camshaft so you'll be spending more money on them anyway and decent brand name heads for big blocks are usually around 900-1500 each so by going this route we're saving a huge amount of money and it will be Okay for the short block, so I'm going to go ahead and put this here.
A little more money up front for me. You don't have to use them, but I'm pretty sure you will at some point in the future. We're going to remove these heads and maybe use a different set of cast heads or maybe upgrade to aluminum heads, but my hope is to be able to reuse some of this arp hardware. Now one of the big downsides to this head is This thing is very heavy, so if you're into drag racing or something, you'll really want to keep that in mind to see if the aluminum heads might be worth it for you.
There we go when you hear Twin Fats and Steel. guitar that has nothing to do with anything, just you know, after a guy got down to business and twisted, I realized I had quite a bit of hanging on the old motor mount here, so I kept my kiara from night and exchanged it for my shakira. stop, she's a little bit thicker, you know, she's also taller, so she fits a man's teeth better when we start with the valve train. Here are a couple of things that I want to remember that I didn't show and that are very important, so you could If you want to move forward in your chair, one of them right away is to remember all that oil that we spread on the cylinders here while we installed our pistons.
Some manufacturers actually say don't do that, but you have to remember that as a manufacturer, they. Basically, we'll go with the lesser of two evils and would rather risk you scratching the cylinder bores a little and getting a good seal on initial startup, then one guy forgets and has a lot of excess oil in there, so take a fluff. A free rag goes back and wipes off what's left and if you remember in part one we talked about the piston rings, those oil rings should have scraped most of it all the way down and then the compression rings should have pushed in a lot up, so clean them, clean the top of the piston, turn it, maybe a quarter of a half turn, clean it again, make sure it's nice and clean, if the guy forgets the rings may take a while to come in spin again and worst case scenario, you can actually glaze the pistons so we don't want to do that.
I always oil them. I just want to make sure the piston skirts are nice and lubricated while we install them. The other thing is you want to chase your threads and your block before you put your heads on and make sure it's a real chase bit, there's not one that's touching or coming out or a scraper digger that you don't want to get any material out of because you could put yourself in a position where you take one away. of these bolts uh oh that's no good talking about bolts this is pretty important yeah yeah it is when you get your hardware some of the builds don't say anything others say hey guy, maybe use a little lubricant or

assembly

sealant, don't I know, so it's going to be up to you to research your particular engine and find out which holes are blind and which holes are through, and that's pretty simple.
A knockout means there is material underneath, so it has been milled or drilled into your block. A through bore means it passes directly into your block and if that happens there is a 99.7342 chance it is a water passage so you are going to want to seal it or you are going to introduce water or coolant into your cylinder. Not good, I use permatex one or two, but There are 927 different flavors, you'll have to decide what you want to do there. It's also useful to have when you go to get your head on and actually just for your build, go on the Internet and type into Google. machine torque sequence and specifications and then you can check them off as you go.
I'm a fan of the red paint here, which is just a few spots I put on these. I won't put them here because I'm going to go eventually. paint this, but I'm going to wait until after we've tested it in case we get any oil leaks or something, once I get it back to the shop I'll give it a good clean and then we'll paint it. One of the things I noticed is that this gets a little confusing on the internet, there are like x's and lines and all these different patterns and things for big block Chevys.
I just remember from small circle to big circle, so if you go one, two, three, four, five, six. seven eight 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 you're done, little one, the big circle and you can also throw this in here if you want, make those three torqualized sequences the same and finish if you don't have a nice clean thread. and mounting lube or sealant on your bolts here a guy might get a false positive on his torque spec false positive is never a good filler especially in torque and pregnancy tests the other thing you want to check while you're In this position, here it is. go ahead and lower the bolts if you're screwing the bolts in make sure they're tight for me that's 50 foot pounds again you want to rely on the filler but you never know these could be put together on a Friday well it's that time , the guy needs to figure it out.
Its proper pushrod length here so he can fully assemble my valvetrain. This is a huge milestone in any engine build and from what I'm told it prevents a lot of fillers from even trying to build it, so I'm going to try to break this down quite a bit today and hopefully make it a little easier to understand. There is a big misconception that I need to play with different pushrod lengths to get my rocker geometry as close as possible and it's actually the other way around, today I'm going to show you how to perfectly set up your rocker geometry and your rod length. thrust is the result of this perfect geometry.
In order to do that, I'm going to go up to the eagle's nest here and guide you through an art class. I'm going to try to illustrate this here so you can visualize and understand what proper rocker geometry is. Then we'll come down here andWe will practically apply and measure this suitable rocker arm. Geometry is when your rocker arm is in a perfect 90 degree relationship with your valve at mid-lift, so before we continue, let's wrap our brain stem around those two things and then the rest of this might have a little more sense, this is a typical The roller rocker here and two of the elements that form that 90 degree angle are right here, the center of its journal, the center of the roller tip and the other is the valve itself, it is It's supposed to be a valve, just squint, you know? so this is at 90 degrees, if we were to remove the rocker body, the second thing is half lift two different ways to think about this, you can combine them, use one or the other, I don't care, but basically that's when the push rod and the lifter are at the middle of the cams, raise the gross lift or the valve spring is at half its maximum compressed height.
As an example, the lift of this cam on the exhaust side is 671, so the average lift if I divide it by 2 is 0.336, we're going to need that in just a minute. Here is one of the things you will need to know beforehand. We can establish that the proper average lift is the rocker arm bolt size if you have a 3 8 bolt which will be 24 threads per inch or 42 thousand inches per turn in the rocker arm nut if you have 7 16 inch bolts which is 20 threads per inch or 50 mil per turn on your toggle nut, so if we come here, the three basic steps we're going to follow are: we're going to initially set a 90 degree angle to the valve and we're going to use the retainer. on the spring because we know it's parallel to the bottom of the valve, so we're going to calculate half our lift, which we've already done here, then we're going to take our turns, which I already did by Taking my gross lift divided times 2 is 336, then I take 0.336 divided by 50 thousandths because I have 7 16 bolts and that equals 6.71 turns, so I'm going to set my 90 degrees.
I'm going to lower my nut 6.71 turns and what that does is when my cam gets to the halfway elevation, I'm going to come back to this 90 degree mark. You can see that this is where the 90 degrees are usually when we initially set it to 90 degrees if we're going to take half. That's how it is now, but when our camera gets to half elevation or halfway, that side goes down and we're in a perfect 90 degree relationship again, which is exactly where we want to be for this scenario here and now. We'll go down and put this in and do it again and maybe with the actual hardware it will make more sense, but first I wanted to explain what we're looking for as I speak. you check it again, you know a guy, I don't know where my cap went, this is going to dry now, some items we're going to need here, of course, we're going to need a pushrod length checker.
I've had this one for years, it's a competition and it's very good, but I also like it and I urge you too to check it with the caliper when we're done, of course, we need a rocker and I use this marker here. draw a center line across the stump to the center of the roller tip and that will help us better visualize that 90 degrees, an allen wrench square, anything to use as a ruler, a paint marker and then of course, our measurements here. for me it's 671 lift half of that is 336 and then we'll use the thread pitch of the rocker bolt as a measuring tool so being at 7 16 of an inch is 50,000 per turn so if I take half of my lift divided by 50 thousandths, I'm going to set that to 6.71 turns, so I'm going to put this in and we'll run this process quickly to make sure that any valve that a guy wants to do this on, his lift is installed correctly and it's on the base or on the bottom of the cam, I'm going to do it on exhaust valve number one here because I know that's the case.
I have the pushrod length checker set down so there is plenty of room here. I'm going to make sure it's seated in the lifter's cup. I'm going to install my rocker. These are 1.7 ultra golds by competition and are the nicest rockers I have ever owned. I'm going to put the nut on just half a turn. one turn just so it doesn't fall out there now I'm going to take that allen wrench and remember that we know that this retainer is at 90 degrees to the valve stem, so we're going to want to line up this line here across our journal and tip of the valve stem. roller to this line here the flat surface on the retainer, so I'm going to take my allen wrench, put this here and that's the line that we're adjusting right there, just make sure that you're lifting the rocker arm firmly onto its nut so it doesn't there's room there and then what we're going to do is we're just going to turn this nut until we see this line where we want it to be right there, now we've set our initial 90 degrees here and I don't want to You need to pay attention to the tip of your rocker arm and where it is. that relationship with the valve stem.
It's completely irrelevant at this point because we're not at half lift, in my case it's on the outside edge of the valve tip and that's fine. At this point, I'm going to put this aside and we're going to remove half of our lift and remember this is a 671 cam, half of our lift is 336, we're going to use the rocker bolt as our measuring tool, which is a 7 16 to 50 thousand per turn, so 336 divided by 50 thousandths is 6.71 turns of this nut. I took my paint marker, I put a little dot here so we can count our laps, so we're going to go to 6.71 one. two three four five there are six and seven one is probably almost three quarters somewhere around there now, when I lift this up, you'll see as we illustrated earlier, this is no

long

er 90 degrees and that's okay because it's at the top.
I'm going to adjust this push rod now until I get to zero lash zero lash is when you get a slight resistance when you turn it but you have no up and down movement. I'll show you real quick, so this is not zero whiplash if If I were to keep spinning this, it's not there yet. I have pressure. I can still turn it. I'm going back. Check this a couple of times right there so I can keep turning this with my fingers like this. Alright. pretty good, now what I can do is remove this nut, remove my rocker arm, we can take out our push rod and take a measurement, be careful not to twist this guy through a little piece of tape here so it doesn't move .
I have that written down here, but we're not done yet. You can check with the lifter and pushrod manufacturer, but I always add an extra 50 thousandths to whatever my measurement is to compensate for the preload of the lifter. I'm going to duplicate it. check that quickly by adding 50 thousandths to this, installing it on the engine, setting my lifter preload and we're going to do the old school valve stem tip test, so again I added 50,000 on my length checker of the push rod, I already installed it. I'm at zero whiplash, enough resistance, it doesn't move up and down now according to the instructions in the competition.
Normally I turn three quarters, but it asks for half, so I'm going to put my key up here. do this about half a turn like this, now we can spin the engine, probably twice will be enough and then we'll see the travel path of our roller on the tip of the valve stem here, now keep your peeper hooked here while I turn this on engine, you'll see this seesaw return to a 90 degree ratio at half lift, I'll be submerged, bingo, we'll go one more, looking down the valley, here, make sure I'm at the base, right there.
Now we'll do this and take a look at our travel route. Well, I don't know about you guys, but that seems pretty central to me. Well, here we go. We've set the pushrod length here by first determining the proper rocker arm. arm geometry and remember this is a result of that, it seems like quite a process, but to get the most performance, safety and reliability out of your engine, this is the way to do it. I head to the watering hole where I get a call to cell service. comp and I got a set of these on the way here and now I dropped it here and cut the oil pump off and I actually ordered a kit so it came with the pump, gasket, intermediate shaft pick up rack, a oil pan and a one-piece oil pan gasket, the nice thing about this is that you know everything works well together.
I don't have to worry about the fit of my truck's grille or anything, and lo and behold, the oil pump on the intermediate shaft is actually a smell. I just renamed it Summit, so that was a nice surprise. It even came with the spring. Here it comes with a standard volume. If you want to hook it at high volume, you can readjust it. I'm not, but some engines are built with different tolerances where that might. Benefit, I lowered this torque to 65 foot-pounds and again use the arp stud. Let's talk about oil pans for a second and I'm going to go ahead and put that in too if you build a filler on a deck. just to make it easier to play bingo and all that, you can go with the original style, but if you're doing a street, off-road, drag racing rally circuit, it actually does matter which chainring you choose because the type can incorporate some features in them.
Nowadays that helps, so this is an original style tray. We have some openings here to allow the oil to go back down below this and what it does is it tries to keep most of the oil in the rear sump here where the truck is. The screen and pump can grab it so you don't lose oil pressure. This is a very old style street pan and you can see here it's a little bit deeper than a factory one so it has a larger capacity and then it comes back. Over and over again, under hard acceleration, the oil wants to rise and this will help keep it inside the pickup tube so you don't lose oil pressure.
This is a new street style tray and if a guy hooks his peepers up close. enough, you'll see it's just a stock tray someone came here and cut the bottom off and hooked a new one up to make it a larger sump area for more capacity and then we have two other features here that one guy wanted one is this scraper here and the guy can stick his hand in there, look, and the other one is this trap door down here, this does three main things for us and they all happen in rapid motion as the torque tornadoes here spin and grab. oil and splash it to create a rotating dough.
This here is going to scrape off that excess rotating mass and take it to the front sump that will pass through the hatch to the rear, so we've reduced the excess rotating mass and by driving it back here. The faster we will keep the oil temperature low and maximize the amount of oil our pump reaches the belt gate. Basically, what that does is also think of it as a dam or a floodgate; keeps as much oil in the rear of the pan as possible so that, under heavy acceleration, the oil returns to this area when it is filled enough, the weight closes, the door continues to grease the pump or, under a Strong deceleration, of course, this door also closes, the oil does not rush to the front of the tray.
It's going to keep a nice pocket here, so when a guy is swinging cookies, donuts, circles, cubes, balloons, I don't know if whatever guy it is will have a lot of pressure coming back and it might break me and then I'll hit a wall, so it's important. Save as much oil as possible here, they have special ones for road courses, they usually look like a little square and they'll have traps everywhere here and a bunch of other boogie traps and I don't know they're super complicated, but this one. it's going to work fine for me and like I said it came as a complete kit which is nice and then it has this one piece seal here and I went ahead and grabbed some new hardware because Frankly I don't know where I put the bolts when I removed them.
Go ahead and spend the extra seven dollars and 24 cents up to about 13.76 and upgrade your board. Get one of these one-piece, cork and gasket. There are always leaks in the timing cover or back here and then people are always doing extra rtv and it becomes a mess. I really like this pump because the screen actually screws directly into the pump housing and comes with different size bushings here. as far as a guy can level up where he wants and that makes there no chance of this pickup tube and screen coming off and I know that sounds like something that will probably never happen, but it happens, this is the 350 that came from the independence and the pickup tube was in the oil pan and somehow this engine went hundreds of miles with that screen on the bottom of the crankcase so it absolutely happens and can happen so this is just extra insurance to make sure. that we always have constant greasing on this thing.
I'm just double checking to make sure this settlescorrectly. There are these little bumps on the front here. I have to line up and the other thing I'm hearing is Make sure I have clearance on my chainring and I do, if you're worried this would be the last time I would go in and check the torque specs on the main caps and cranks but I I put the red dots. so I'm ready to move on, well she's on and twisted up to 12 foot pounds. She tries to avoid going until your ears get warm. Most likely she'll just cause a leak, but she looks sharper than Meryl Streep's nose and I'm not kidding.
Before you put the rocker arms on, you want to give them a bath and some mineral spirits or something, make sure they're really clean and then I put a little bit of that valve train assembly spray on the journal and also on the valve stem. The valve. tips here after putting them in, I'll come back one more time, I'll set up the poly locks, you know, loosely, for now I'm almost done with the valve train here, we know we have the correct rocker arm geometry, we also know that and confirmed it. get the pushrod length right, the last step I have to do here is just put a little bit of lifter preload on it and we'll do it on this motor with zero play in about three quarters of a turn.
I decided to do it. on the adjuster knot or the Polylock which varies by construction so just pay attention to your application so what is whiplash is the distance between the roller tip and the valve stem and for me that is zero, which means just making contact so I'm going to show you my way to adjust the hydraulic lifter preload and I promise you it's the easiest way in fact my 10 year old son has literally done it now he can put it in neutral top, adjust the valves, turn it and do the rest, but it's easy to get lost, it's easy. not understanding which valve is doing what and if you have intake, it becomes even more confusing and if you get interrupted or have to run to the fridge for a cold snack, no, it's probably just me, but we don't need to overdo it anyway.
To complicate it, I learned this way when I was up to a horse's knees, I saw my dad do it in his race car right in the pits and lo and behold, almost every racer and engine builder was doing it this way. way and it makes sense, so I'm going to show you very quickly and in detail how to set the hydraulic lifter preload and this works on any hydraulic lifter, whether it's a roller or a flat tappet, Ford Mopar GM, but it doesn't matter if it's of a hydraulic pushrod motor, this method will work. and I promise you it's the quickest, easiest, most accurate way to do it so the first thing we need to do is go around and set all of these to zero lash and that's really easy with these poly locks just keep screwing the nut on down here. until you have no up and down motion and you can twist the pushrod between your fingers and I'm going to do this on all of them real quick and then I'll show you up close, it doesn't even matter where the engine is. in your rotation it doesn't matter if it's top dead center or where it is now just turn around and set this whole thing to zero lash.
I'm going to loosen this up and see how this push rod has up and down movement, which means you have movement on the opposite side so that its tab is greater than zero. Remember we want this to just make contact, but no more than that, so keep turning this nut down until you get no up and down movement, then I like to shake them a little bit. A little bit just make sure everything is seated and also make sure your pushrod is properly in the lifter cup down here you still have a little bit of movement a little bit more okay now I really have no movement up and down, it goes from side to side, that's what.
Well, we're looking up and down and I don't have it right now. I'm going to take and turn the push rod between my fingers and what we're feeling is resistance rolling it, so now it's very easy and if I just change this a little bit now that I have pressure there, that's right where I want to be, don't you want go beyond that and that will be zero attacks here and I'm going to do that with all of these like I said so give me a minute here and I'll work without going up and down a little bit of resistance and of course if you don't have locks of polyethylene, you will only have that nut. on the outside so slowly move your ratchet around the questions so far oh that's a good one no you don't need to pump up your lifters it's a handcuffs tale it's like putting crankshafts on end to make them bend or putting batteries in specifically, liquidate them, no. it actually works against you because your valves will try to open if you have inflated the lifters and some of you might be thinking, wait a minute, some of these lifters are on the top of the cam or the top of the lobe here, yeah , that's right.
What we've done now is set everything to zero lash as is, but I'm going to take and turn the motor over 90 degrees right there. Now I'm going to go over this again and I'm going to look for any loose ones some of these have quite a bit of pressure already trying to open a valve look this one is loose tighten it I'm going to go over here again and I'm going to look for any loose ones look look at this one it was at zero now it's not so I'm going to bring this back down to zero lash now we're going to do this a few times until we go through the entire rotation twice and what we're going to finish up What we do is we check this a few times to see if there's zero lash and set them to that and then at the end we're going to set the riser preload.
Look, this guy is very loose, now bring them back down to zero right there, okay, okay, let's rotate. again 90 degrees bring this guy so he's on the heel of the camera now bring it down to zero no up and down movements just rotate between your fingers so I'm going to continue doing this process rotate it to 90 degrees 90 degrees 90 degrees until let it go two full turns, keep setting them all to perfect for zero lashes. The good thing is, guys, if you need to quit at night or during the day, go to lunch, make a phone call, order parts, it doesn't matter where you are. start or where you stop, it doesn't matter what valve is open, what valve is closed, where you are, it doesn't matter, just come back, make sure everyone is at zero, turn the engine over 90 and continue, so now go The boys They probably figured it out by going around twice and checking the whip over and over again effectively.
What we did was zero the whip as soon as the lifter hit the heel of the cam and the second time we double checked it. you are setting the whip when the lifter is at the top of the cam all we were doing is taking up the slack to hold everything together now each of these we know because we just double checked some of them are at zero whip. tease, some of them still spin depends on where the lifter is on the cam, don't pay attention to that now setting your preload is just as easy, all we're going to do is start back or start forward, start wherever you want , I'm just going to take each and every poly lock and I'm going to do three-quarter turns and drop my set screw.
I no

long

er need to turn the engine half three. a quarter, a half, about three quarters and keep going down each one of them, it doesn't matter what order you do them in, but don't do them twice, so I'm going to go down one side like this and then back down the other . side, so now what we're doing is setting that preload on each one. You can do this outside the vehicle. You can do this on the vehicle again. It doesn't matter if it is a flat pusher or a roller. It doesn't matter if it is ford gm dodge whatever if it is a push rod engine with a hydraulic lift this method will work and be correct.
The last step I'm going to do here is tighten these poly locks to 20 foot pounds and that's going to drive that set screw into the rocker bolt and just make doubly sure it's not going anywhere and that's it guys don't count the rotations, they don't understand where the valves are, there is no need, they don't have to give firing orders, nothing from us. We've set the valve lash to zero and then put exactly the same amount of preload on each pushrod and lifter, and that's it, the valve train is ready if I went too fast for a guy or you want to go through again this.
I have another video dedicated to adjusting hydraulic lifters that is somewhere on the playlist. Just look up the hydraulic lifter adjustment and I do the same process on a small block Chevy and that's it before I pour some oil in here and put the intake on. I have to do some cleaning around the house, a couple of weird things. I have an oil filter adapter that I need to install. I'm going to use a Wix Racing filter. I have an off plate fuel pump block that I need to put in and a timing. The tab can't see anything.
I wonder how much torque these will have. I'm going to use everything. I'm going to pour my brake oil right into the valley. Here you will lubricate the cam on your way down. Get some. on the distributor gear back here, you can even shoot a little bit towards the timing cover, here we can get our gears. I think some guy is going to close the shutter here and call this a long block in part three, we'll fix it with something. accessories intake valve covers water pump lighting system back here we'll talk about the total cost and then of course we're going to chain this on a dyno and see what kind of power it makes thanks everyone for watching see you next time you

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