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Bay Area Homeless - Concern or Crisis Part 1

Apr 21, 2024
it could happen to anyone it could happen to anyone and it's just difficult

homeless

people in the Bay Area many people are an incident an accident a job loss the exact same situation tens of thousands of people living on the streets someone comes every day families staying in cars in shelters and struggling to get their children to school there is a mix you seem to get but a lot of it is people who just seem upset, those who served our country living in a tent on concrete sidewalks, it's bad, could you come like me? said its 2:30 this morning and now a new face of the

homeless

victims of the Bay Area housing

crisis

borrowing cars or sleeping on a couch sleeping under a bridge or in the field or on the sidewalk in somewhere is there a solution?
bay area homeless   concern or crisis part 1
What are we doing now? It's clearly not working, lawmakers, cities, counties, are scrambling to find answers. Homeless residents are in our city and we can choose to leave them outside in our parks, streets, our streams or we can shelter them. The widespread problem in our faces is trying to be compassionate. and measured I want to help the homeless but not this way put them at the fairgrounds put them anywhere politicians business leaders and Bay Area residents agree that something needs to be done to help the homeless The Bay Area has a population of over seven million people and unfortunately thousands of them live on the streets.
bay area homeless   concern or crisis part 1

More Interesting Facts About,

bay area homeless concern or crisis part 1...

Well that may seem like a small percentage of the people who live here, the fact is they are human beings who need help. Good evening, I'm Julie Haner and Frank Somerville. We're talking here about regular people who are now living in tents or in a car on the street and there are many reasons why they ended up there, sometimes it's job loss or a medical problem or a drug problem or problems With him many people say that even with a steady job and a roof over their head and living paycheck to paycheck, they are one wrong step away from the same fate, so tonight what we're going to do is try to throw some light on the issue and hopefully open up a dialogue for us that will lead to possible solutions.
bay area homeless   concern or crisis part 1
I recently spent some time near our station here in Oakland in a tent city under a freeway. You probably noticed that these tent cities are literally popping up all over the Bay Area and we wanted to know who the people are that live there and what their lives are like, I talked to two of them, they talked about the huge rats, they deal with the noise, how they go to the bathroom and what was the last time they could. to take a real shower, do you mind if I ask you what it's like to be here? violet disagreements that happen with people from different walks of life we ​​may not be a diplomatic review some of us who miss wives or children it's never boring it's never boring, good boy, I'm not telling you, I'm never bored like normally that cook I think I stole grills, you know, let's say you have to go to the bathroom, where are you going?
bay area homeless   concern or crisis part 1
I keep a bucket with maybe a little bleach and I don't know what works, but it's bigger between separate things in Hazzard. You know, I made a bottle out of a verb so you know what bucket people don't keep it covered. New beeps and stuff here in the chili you want to kill. this food some people urinate in the dirt I don't agree with that in the rest you wouldn't believe how these rats really move they come back and everything is rearranged so you can claim it from your neighbor and get it the rest there are people there who say look, I understand that they are homeless people, but you know what, I don't want to walk among needles, I don't want to walk among all this garbage, I don't want them in my neighborhood, what would you say to those people because around a bus company they see the same situations that people live?
I lost my house there in 2008, that real estate crash, but it could happen to you, man, I wouldn't be so quick to be so critical. Man and jump to conclusions about people What do you want people to know about you? So I'm not a victim I'm not a victim I'm not a victim I don't like that you know I mean we're all fighting man and I think we're all in the same water but we're not in the same boat this is hard not to get emotional when you see this just thinking about this is where they look at this is what they have and there are so many people who were just a couple of paychecks away from a potential being and it's so easy to walk past them and not think about anything we're all human beings we just You know what it is, it's really sobering, it's really sobering to think that someone is experiencing an attack. well, that's all they have when you say you can't deal with the Caltrans people, what do you mean by that because they kick you out, not only do they deliberately target your belongings and they don't come to clean up, they come to just pick us up and then take everything we own, they hope that if they take everything we own, most of us have nowhere else to go.
Oh, plan my house. I've been here for 35 years. I have been homeless. I was a homeowner taxpayer as a business owner, you know, I ran random businesses with my dad for 19 years downtown, it's horrible, it's hard and you know I'm a mechanic. I live here on the streets, all my things. It's subject to being stolen at any time I leave my camp it's an open game that's why I put up the little fence, said little Ben. I collected my search into some pallets and put them together and it's just a deterrent if they really wanted something. that was here all you have to do is jump let me ask you point blank what was the last time you showered when was the last time you could take 3 weeks 3 weeks nor the facilities available to us there are but they are unpleasant or they steal things from you one of the hard things to do here stay clean we don't have bathrooms we don't have running water we have to get water from the taps and then return it to our campsites by card that's what the five gallon buckets are and then we stay we try to wash all we can One of the things I notice is that I'm talking to you is how intrusive the park is that passes they have trucks that pass how?
You deal with it, I try not to pay attention to it, but it's hard, it's been hard for me, mentally, psychologically, physically. I was living under the overpass. There's a lot of dust on the road around here and it's not really a good help, it's not very useful. What we have to do is give us a large property with a fence around it. Remove the fence. We set up camps there. We'll watch it ourselves. Give us a couple of containers. Give us some port-a-potties. You already solved the garbage problem. it's about the problem of human waste we're everywhere we're everywhere I don't know what our numbers are right now but they're growing and they're growing fast I mean I was the only one here on this block Four years ago, four years ago , I was alone here, alone, once you are in the homeless right, it is very difficult to get out of this.
The latest count found that nearly 30,000 homeless people lived in the Bay Area, which is about the same number of people living in the city of Burlingame. Their numbers are calculated from a one-night blitz in which thousands of volunteers and homeless advocates took to the streets to count the homeless population. The count is carried out every two years. The most recent count occurred in January of this year, homeless people are not only scattered throughout urban slums, sleeping in alleys and begging for change. The homeless, of course, are in Oakland, San Jose and San Francisco, but they are also in the suburbs, in small towns along residential streets and their numbers are increasing in East Contra Costa County, for example. , the number of people living without permanent housing increased by 33 percent between 2015 and 2017, just over half of those people live in the Antioch community, unfortunately the news about homelessness in big cities is also not is promising: Alameda County's homeless population increased about 40 percent between now and half of that county's homeless people live in Oakland, a possible reason median rents rose 25 percent since 2015, but at the same time median household income increased by just 5 percent.
Head south to Silicon Valley, in Santa Clara County, the number of homeless people increased by thirteen percent. cent in the last two years. More shocking was the drastic increase in the number of homeless youth, that number skyrocketing by a whopping 286 percent; There are now more than 3,500 homeless youth. living in that county, San Francisco is where homelessness may be most visible; have 7,500 people living on the streets, but no longer simply clustered in the center of the city, some residential neighborhoods saw a drastic increase in the number of homeless people in the Richmond district. for example, the number of homeless people doubled between 2015 and 2017, in other

area

s it tripled, those are the numbers, but why are they so extreme in the Bay Area?
I sat down with UC Berkeley professor Sam Davis, an expert who has been studying homelessness in the Bay Area for years and is currently on a board with Berkeley Mayor Jesse ARAG as he looks for ways to address the problem, Professor Davis says when it comes to affordable housing for homeless people it's our biggest problem, housing is, you know, I mean, not just saying that because I'm an architect, that's the answer, we just need more housing and we need housing that is suitable for the different populations, as we mentioned, and that they can afford. I moved here 20 years ago and I don't remember it.
Seeing the homeless encampments, the tent cities that I'm seeing now, I mean, some of them are expanding now, they're taking up entire city blocks. What has changed or what is creating this? Where do they come from? Well, I don't know if they're Coming from afar, I think the data shows that most of the people who have become homeless were in the county living in the county before they became homeless. I think in Alameda County that's 80 or 82 percent of the people counted last year. in the county who lived here before they became homeless, are we seeing more families?
Are we seeing more different types of homeless spaces? Yes, we are definitely seeing more families, we are seeing more families with young children, which is really tragic, but not just for health. issues surrounding that, but also issues of education, so yeah, I think home, if so, again. I'd have to look back at the data, but I think I'm pretty sure the population of homeless families with young children is growing. and it's a pretty large portion of the overall homeless population and if you'd like to hear more of our conversation, the full video is posted on our website at KTVU dot-com.
We have created a special section on homelessness dedicated to this important topic. The fact is that throughout the Bay Area there are many people affected and some of the most vulnerable are families who take to the streets every morning, we walk about ten blocks just to get to the bus that will take them to school. You don't have to worry about where we're staying tonight. You know, we'll have more on this family's incredible journey coming soon, plus, what is it about the Bay Area that some would say lends itself to a growing homeless population? We'll explore the different factors that a former mayor says are definitely

part

of the problem tonight's special on homelessness in the Bay Area continues right after this break my son calls me turtle, you know, here at my house , in my rear compasses, telling the family that if they sleep on the streets or in a vehicle they will be able to access shelter faster; that is the harsh reality;
As families learn that if they move to the streets, the possibility of permanent housing may come sooner than simply surviving in a shelter, city officials say there are now more than three thousand homeless children in San Francisco, many of those Children end up missing school due to lack of proper nutrition and experiencing exhaustion from lack of sleep and stress. We recently spent a day with a homeless family in San Francisco and saw firsthand the struggles they face ktvu's Tara Moriarty has her story at 6:45am. At San Francisco's first Friendship Shelter, families filter in, including Meadow Silvestre, her husband Aaron Burrows, and her eight-year-old son, AJ.
It really seems to me that poverty is the new thing. prejudices. against the three of them sleeping together on a mat AJ in the middle in a room filled with 50 other homeless people many people snoring. I hear this almost every morning the three of them pack their bags and leave at 7 o'clock, that's when all the families see each otherforced We are only allowed to return later in the afternoon every morning we walk about 10 blocks just to get to the bus that will take them to school, first we stop at a market and Pete's coffee, after dipping into the bank account, Meadow He finds out that they only have $140 left for the rest. of the month and it's only the 12th, yes please, the family lives off Meadows' state disability and errand welfare checks that total $1,500 a month.
Town officials say a long, drawn-out dispute between landlords, along with skyrocketing rents, forced them to abandon their Bayview a

part

ment. You get a mix of looks, but many of them are people who just look disgusted. Aaron suffers from social anxiety disorder. Meadow has spina bifida and post-traumatic stress disorder. They are both recovering heroin addicts every morning. They wash in the market bathroom. They only shower once a week. the shelter while Aaron has to leave for a doctor's appointment. Meadow walks six more blocks into town and takes the bus to AJ's school. AJ is very aware of his situation lately.
He's been having trouble at school. He gets sick frequently and doesn't sleep. well in the shelter full of crying babies and snoring adults W icx School his teachers say AJ ends up sleeping most days on this cot set up in the school's main office if CPS is going to take me you know you were afraid that I would leave him at school and then maybe he wouldn't come back. The family has been trying for five months to get a shelter where they can have their own room and work toward more permanent housing. The compasses tell the family that if they sleep on the streets or in a vehicle they will be able to access shelter faster.
There are at least 7,500 homeless people in San Francisco, 3,200 of them children, according to the Compass family homeless program, which says it received calls from 5,200 Bay Area families last year seeking shelter service and that's just a fraction of the actual number these quotes say. I fill out these applications and it's so depressing that the Burroughs lost their section 8 voucher, so finding a new house on $1,500 a month is almost impossible in the rental range. Now, for a two-bedroom home, it could cost an average of $4,800. It is truly a miracle that families survive the day-to-day routine. Officials here say the township's best option is to find permanent supportive housing where there is on-site support. and the rent is adjusted based on income, but the likelihood that they can find a unit in San Francisco is swimming without a family to help them, they say they will continue to work their way through the system, get a job, get off the streets and get a home.
You shouldn't have to worry about where we're staying tonight. You know, for AJ anyway. Yes, I made a mistake or whatever and I tried to rectify the situation, but they are still punishing me. My whole family is in San. Francisco Tara Moriarty KTVU Fox 2 News In the last month since we spoke with the family Aaron Meadow and AJ bought a mobile home they now live in, they tell us it's a way to show the homeless advocacy group that we are ready to move into permanent housing, we will stay in touch with them and keep you informed about their journey, whether in San Francisco, the East Bay or the South Bay, homeless encampments and ten cities are more visible than ever and while the problem needs to be addressed the frustrations can boil over it is very difficult for people who live in neighborhoods where they walk out the door and you know there are needles, people don't have a place to go to the bathroom, it scares their kids and they are afraid of camps. homeless encampments expand many business owners say it is impacting their bottom line, they have taken over everything and we are

concern

ed about the safety of our employees more on that and other issues that arise in this

crisis

or special

concern

from KTVU in the one my wife works there and I go in and catch the blarg and when you get off the highway there's just a homeless cat.
I mean, I lived in the Bay Area for thirty years and when people started begging on the street and living on the street and standing in traffic asking for money on the street, I hadn't just seen it in poor parts of Mexico and I've never seen this country ask any of these, as average working class people, we should have the right to not have to jump through hoops for heroin. needles that we should have the right to not have to like, you know, breathe crack smoke in our community and that's the problem that I can't solve.
It is very sad. Did you see not only individuals? You see entire families homeless without much hope. As you drive around the Bay Area, it's not difficult to find a homeless encampment. Many are expanding as homeless people form their own communities, in some cases spanning entire blocks. Crews worked to clean up tent cities, but they seem to just move from Recently, block by block, the city of Oakland took steps to clean up trash outside businesses, but as soon as the trash is gone, it starts to accumulate again. City officials have tried to support some encampments by giving them porta-potties and barricades to keep encampments from flooding into the streets, something that is a more humane and healthy option for dealing with homeless people.
A recent UC Berkeley study found that moving homeless people from one space to another may not be cost-effective, so what's the answer? problem facing communities in many cities around the Bay Area, officials say in March they found more than a hundred encampments lining the streets of Oakland, so why the Bay Area, why are there so many homeless people? home here, is it the climate, is it our culture? Some say that has something to do with it. Former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown recently spoke to us about culture. This is what he told us is in other places and there is no doubt that people tell them exactly how much better raw you are if they are in need in San Francisco compared to somewhere else, so they will migrate to San Francisco for that purpose and We are a very generous city, it is a complex issue, although some point to the culture here, Professor Sam Davis of UC Berkeley, who has been studying homelessness.
The problem for years pointed to several different factors. I actually don't think culture is contributing much. I think it's more about the economy, employment and mental health support, and I think that's been exacerbated by rising rents. other costs in the Bay Area and I don't know if there's really been an explosion. I would have to review the numbers from the last few years. I just think it's much more visible. I think camps have become something like that. a new phenomenon: people were living on the streets, but not clustered in clusters like they seem to have been last year, unfortunately all the homeless encampments seemed to continue to grow and many business owners and employees work next door or right across the street of these. tent cities and have legitimate concerns ktvu's Frank Mallicoat spoke with people on both sides of the issue are hiding under countless miles of Oakland's BART track Ted cities where a year ago there was one now dozens have sprung up blocks from City Hall on street corners Whole have been absorbed where now laundry trash and commerce are mixed is one of the industrial

area

s like here in West Oakland have become slums with a flea market Style this is the bottom some are here for drug use others are here because of mental illness or finances, whatever the In case the word is out, Oakland is quickly becoming a haven for the homeless.
She sleeps here. Man, it's my sleeping bag. She laughs. You just ruled it out. Iraq War veteran Lee Smith calls his minivan home. He is found under a tarp on West Oakland Wood Street. His brave neighborhood has grown from 60 to almost 200. Additionally, last year Smith is a handyman and says he wants to go out but just can't afford it. I'm on a fixed income, you know, and the rent went up and this almost proves it, come on. like that without having to pick up the tab so I had to make a decision you grew up in Hillsboro in Danville did you ever think you'd break up? no no no no no mavin Carter Griffin describes himself as a gypsy with a craftsman Sartre a divorce sent a foreclosure pushed this California-shaped generation onto a wooden street four years ago and she's in no hurry to get out.
I see it as a culture, like I said, I think we are a culture, not a problem, we are evolving and we are trying very hard to have some dignity and respect and learn to live with each other. It's an experiment. I think it's an urban experiment. An experiment that makes some Oakland businesses say enough is enough. Alright. Ray Mizzou owns Golden West. envelope company right across from the Wood Street encampment, they've taken over everything and we're worried about the safety of our employees, we're worried about what's going to happen to our insurance rates because everything goes up because of what's going on here.
The activity that appreciates in value but insurance rates go up is just a big mess, a mess that has no quick fix. Homelessness isn't just an Oakland problem, it's a Bay Area problem, a problem that will perhaps take a generation to fix. every day, every day, basically, for some life-long civilizations like Oakley Toribio, they feel forgotten, no one comes here and assesses the situation or sees if anyone can, uh, I don't know, do better, you know, than Sam be evacuated or next steps be taken. more context to do better Joseph has called this 980 overpass in West Grand home for over two years as a college graduate lady who couldn't get a job and now dreams of a way out.
I don't want to be homeless or not I don't want to be someone who doesn't really and now this fits in with society in general, you know, because the camp doesn't define me, it's just a place for Pichet, he can be in Oakland Frank Mallicoat KTVU Fox 2 News throughout the Bay Area. We are seeing a whole new side of homelessness in one case, a man who dedicated his time to helping the homeless after a time on the streets is now back on the streets himself living in a car initially it was a homeless man in the jungle for whom he fought a good fight many people, including himself, dedicated themselves to housing now that he is back on the streets, that reflects the problem and also many experts say that the root of the problem is housing, a problem that is driving people onto the streets or out of the Bay Area.
I originally lived in Mountain City. See and then they charged me from there and I moved to the city of Santa Clara They charged me from there I moved to the city of Sunnyvale they charged me from there tonight's special homeless people in the Bay Area concern or crisis we will be De Back, homelessness is a problem that is not just limited to the Bay Area in the Pacific Northwest. Homelessness in Seattle has increased 10% over the past two years, during which time Los Angeles County has seen a 23% increase; There are now almost 60,000 people living on the streets. homelessness also affects smaller regions in central Oregon there are now 30% more people without permanent housing on the east coast Vermont has increased almost 20% and finally in New York City the number of people without Homelessness on the streets increased almost 40 percent In the last two years, that being said, across the country, the homeless population has decreased, so why are many of these statistics increasing in the Bay Area?
When it comes to the issue of homelessness, one thing that cannot be ignored is the lack of access to affordable services. housing and that's especially true here in the Bay Area with the tech boom and popularity of Bay Area home prices skyrocketing. ktvu's Tom Baker takes a closer look at our housing crisis. I originally lived in the city of Mountain View and then I got the price ran out from there and moved to the city of Santa Clara the price ran out from there I moved to the city of Sunnyvale the price ran out from there the American dream of being homeowner and California's dream of an easy life is in a severe drought that has lasted for decades and there is no economic El Niño to end it.
I had a kindergarten teacher, a wonderful teacher who got married in May, they couldn't afford a house here and they moved to San Diego, so I lost a really great teacher. African colored people. Americans, Latinos, we don't see a future here because of fax rent increases Matt Reagan, policy director of the Bay Area Council, a consortium of the Bay Area's largest employers, we continue to stay more and more back in the last decade, we haveallowed approximately one new home for every eight jobs we have created as a state California needs to create about one hundred and eighty thousand housing units a year just to keep pace with natural population growth, we average about 80, that hot competition has skyrocketed prices.
About 300 11,000 housing units have been built in California in the last decade, but during that same time California's population has grown by three point two five million, ten times more new people than housing units, according to the calculations of the California Association of Realtors than overall Bay Area single-family homes are now eight percent more expensive than just a year ago and much higher in Santa Clara Alameda and San Mateo County. Today, the median home price in the Bay Area is approximately nine hundred nine thousand dollars, sixty-four percent higher than California. high statewide average when we have a significant number of working families living in their cars we have a crisis the rent increases we are seeing now are the highest we have ever seen without even considering the chronic homeless people lining the streets and highway underpasses with tent cities Affordable housing builder Steve Marshall, founder of Little House on the Trailer, says that has led many to seek out or create a wide variety of illegal living spaces, from warehouses to garages, recreational vehicles in poor condition, shacks, sheds and backyards, and which may well represent 25%. of our housing stock Marshall says the city and county's own buildings and code enforcement departments are well aware that this is happening and have a generally strict policy if no one complains, they are grateful that housing exists, we know that housing costs are killing people and suffocating people and we have to do more to get housing built.
A state scientific poll last month commissioned by affordable housing advocates shows that a majority of Californians are willing to support up to $9 billion in housing bonds to build affordable housing even if affordable housing units could be reduced to hundred thousand dollars each, that nine billion dollars would create only 90,000 units, half of what we need to keep pace with population growth, but that does not include the cost of land utilities and many fees required by the communities. to allow those units of this delivered house to be 1/3 of the total and that's not to mention the resistance of homeowners and citizens who share everything from the reduction in property values ​​to the decrease in quality of life that reduced the 99 San Jose potential sites for affordable housing only for people who have what they have, are happy with the current situation, people believe that affordable housing, for example, negatively affects the value of their home. that is patently false, We know that building affordable housing in communities does not have a negative impact on home values, so Tom, even if there is affordable housing, how does that help the chronically homeless?
Well, chronically homeless people have more problems than just needing a place to live if they just stay. them in a box many of them are not going to like it there many of them will leave and we will destroy that environment what they need or other type of care they need mental care they need drug rehabilitation they need this world of other treatments that must be done and that will add at least 25 to 50 percent more to the cost of housing, no matter how low the cost is, there are some really difficult answers that will cost me a lot, Tom. thank you, the housing crisis is something that everyone in the Bay Area has to deal with, whether they are homeless or not, but it is really affecting the marginalized, those trying to make a difference. eight views and Ruben talked to a man who has dedicated his time to advocating for the homeless, but now he himself ended up on the streets like this is hard to come by, you know, this is a heavy tarp.
Robert Aguirre spends most of his time advocating for the homeless, whether in the encampments or at San José City Hall. providing a bridge, I provide the connection to the people who have the solutions so that people have the need, it's something he's been doing for years, but suddenly this summer, Geary's circumstances changed when he received a letter from his own Since then, San José changed the rules on evictions, but for Giri it was too late after almost three years in that apartment, he was now homeless, a friend lent him this car and has been living in it ever since.
July sleeping under Ridge in the field or on the sidewalk somewhere, one giri admits that he is better equipped to handle this than most, in fact, he was once homeless before living in the infamous San Jose camp called the jungle , this happened after his business as a technology consultant disappeared. low and it was his experience there that made him a passionate advocate initially he was homeless in the jungle he fought a good fight for many people including himself he got housing now he is back on the street reflects the problem the problem is that a Giri Like many others, he has a Section 8 voucher in hand, but there are long waiting lists for any apartment willing to accept them, so Giri got creative and asked the mayor and city council members to write him letters of recommendation. and they did when I showed up with Those letters change the conversation.
Giri wants to make it clear that he is not looking for special treatment, just an opportunity to rent a place in the meantime, he says that he will continue to fight for the homeless like he always has. You would have to shoot. let me stop. I can't stop while Giri looks for a new apartment. He says he will continue to advocate for other projects like the proposed tiny houses in San Jose that could help others besides himself in San Jose and Ruben KTVU Fox. 2 The news for some people hoping for a place to rent is not an option KTVU reporter Amber Lee met up with the Man Doll family last month in Oakland, they were living in their car while looking for a place to rent with their three children. ended up homeless when his mother Aisha became ill after giving birth to her youngest son.
With limited income and skyrocketing housing prices, the Dolph's man decided they had no choice but to leave Oakland and move to Las Vegas where they could find an apartment. for half the price I don't want to feel like that again. I'm going to make better plans for our future. The dolls were able to find an apartment and pay an entire year's rent thanks to a lot of generosity. contributions to a GoFundMe account and last week we contacted them via Skype in Aisha tells us her family is doing very well, especially her children, they are excited to adjust to new schools, the baby is running and you know, they're just having a great time.
What is the best? part of all this we saw the piece that Amber did where you slept in your car you washed in sinks and bathrooms it seemed like it was a really difficult contrast to what it is now Wow, I can't even sit there, words don't even explain how much we tend to take for granted when you don't have the simple things in life, the ability to walk by the refrigerator and eat something or make dinner. I'm so excited. I have prepared dinner every night. Ayesha says that being homeless was one of the hardest things she has ever faced and she says she will never look at homeless people the same way.
They are still ahead, serving their country and many living on the streets seeking to find the Bay Area's homeless veterans. Are you a veteran in need of services? we are looking for veterans any veteran hello anyone at home we accompany the Gulf War veteran as he goes store by store looking for homeless veterans many of the chronic cases of homelessness are people with mental illness it is a health care problem that needs almost constant treatment to help people mental illnesses different from any other type of illness it is the illness itself that prevents or can prevent people from knowing that if they have something they could benefit from help and treatment and then do something in this regard San Francisco General recently opened a facility for those transitioning from the hospital to the outside world working to ensure they do not end up on the streets, some of them will be able to spend the night, but we will do medical management medication management psychiatric support addiction support and will be a day treatment program along with an overnight State Mayor Ed Lee and other city leaders toured the facility in late August, it is called the Hummingbird Navigation Center and will cost nearly $3 million a year to operate many of The nation's veterans are dealing with mental health issues after serving our country many develop post-traumatic stress disorder and unfortunately some of those veterans end up on our streets this week Kate sees that Rob Roth spent time with some homeless veterans and Other former service members hoping to help Lawrence Rosenberg says he doesn't like to talk about his days as a Marine fighting in the Vietnam War in the late '60s.
It scares me. It always scared me. There is still a free railway code. We caught up with Rosenberg recently in San Francisco's Tenderloin, but he says that for most of the last 14 months he's been sleeping outside on Haight Street, it sucks, I mean, taking the beating getting him ready. Rob Rosenberg says that sometimes he can't believe he was caught in a downward spiral that took him from the military to the streets, he gets emotional. I served my flag, I made my own, you know, and yeah, big boys cry, big boys, don't cry, man, you ain't got no heart, yeah, Rosenberg is one in a hundred. and thirty-seven chronically homeless veterans in San Francisco, according to the latest homeless census, there are about four hundred other veterans considered homeless but not living on the streets, which is a decrease from two years ago in San Francisco, are you a veteran? the veteran benben como is going ten by ten looking for homeless veterans we are looking for veterans any veteran hello anyone at home Ben como is a swords to plowshares outreach worker who works to get those who serve the military off the streets, he says many of them have you give up while in service you have a sense of purpose you have dignity in what you are doing and then to lose all of that for whatever reason on the streets is a real crash and burn situation how long have you been homeless in the streets, it seemed like fourteen months, but on this day Ben Como and Lawrence Rosenberg met for the first time, if you sign there, those are the first permits, like swords or plowshares, tells us that with the help of the city, Rosenberg now has a case manager and should get a permanent place to live this month much of the work is convincing that we can help them is available to them we encourage them to choose to let us work with them we always give vets the choice and Sometimes it is difficult because they may not make the right decisions that we would like them to make.
This former Marine seems to have made the right decision after years of heroin addiction and homelessness when I wasn't honest when it really got to me. By doing this, he now lives in a federally subsidized studio in a building on Kearney Street for homeless veterans. This is paradise. I just have an attitude of gratitude. Fits plowshares. The cost of war does not end after the battlefield. We are all. Know the cost, continued CEO Michael Blacker says public attitudes toward veterans have improved since he returned home from serving in Vietnam. The good news is that some tangible results can be seen from HUD's investments, and the public sector has delivered bad news and will do so as well. those investments continue to increase and that's what we need a place to live is what Michael Boutwell, an 81-year-old homeless Vietnam veteran, needs former Army sergeant says he now sleeps along the Embarcadero I don't know, probably died I don't know in San Francisco Rob Rob KTVU Fox 2 News seeing homeless people on the streets of San Francisco is nothing new, but what is new are the large growing encampments, something we have not seen before, they are picking up between two and four tons of garbage a day.
Just day since these camps featured in this PT bu special report, the growing frustration facing San Francisco city workers and what they are doing to try to control the problem. ARecent count in San Francisco revealed that around 7,500 people have no place to call home and every night around 60% of them are forced to fend for themselves on the streets, that is, 4,500 people every night sleep rough in cold last year, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee created the Department of Homelessness to address the problem. ktvu's Tara Moriarty spoke with the director that she is working to find long-term solutions.
Tara also spoke with the head of Public Works that she is working on short-term solutions and spoke with a supervisor who says that right now the city simply is not doing enough grading. I've been living on the streets of San Francisco for seven years and I just said I didn't have a place to stay anymore, so I moved around as much as I could and ended up here. Originally from Antioch, the 36-year-old lost his job due to a work injury from which he also suffers. from PTSD you get fishbowl syndrome because you never have time to decompress without people always staring at you or calling the police today, but you're upset because you're losing all your stuff, public works crews are doing a sweep They are cleaning this homeless encampment, collecting urine and feces and throwing away trash.
They are collecting between two and four tons of garbage per day in these camps alone. Meet Mohammed Nuru, the head of the Department of Public Works, he sees the dirty side. of homeless people don't have bathrooms they don't know, they poop, they pee, you know, right outside the store and then there are the needles. Roos' new computers can learn 17,500 needle words in just one month. It is a job that can not only be dangerous but downright dangerous we have had a good number of attacks 12 workers on a very regular basis some call the janitors on their team for the homeless people of the city as we say in public works done service nuru says that homeless encampments seemed to increase with San Francisco hosting the Super Bowl in 2016, right after the Super Bowl we started to see more tents and with the construction boom in the city, especially in the South Market area and the homeless people of Mission Bay, forced us out only to emerge in other neighborhoods, well, there was nothing here.
It's been a problem for months and I really don't know why this is acceptable. I mean, we have an encampment and I asked the Department of Homelessness that we not have cabinets in my district. Yes, it seems that nothing is happening. Jeff she oversees district 8 including Glen Park Noe Valley and Castro when I see my district suddenly getting worse because of what's going on at the mission or because they're cleaning up the Civic Center and people just hop on Muni and come here or hop on BART and come to Glynn Park, that doesn't help. She says the city needs to be more aggressive.
We call the outreach teams here. Outreach teams came and talked to people and people refused services. The outreach teams simply left. There is no solution. We throw money away when we pay people to interact with other people and not solve the problem. This problem took 40 years to develop. Jeff Cosette heads the city's new Homeless Department. These are people. This is someone's son and someone's daughter. When they were young and grew up wanting to live on the streets, Kozinski says the homeless crisis in America has been brewing for decades. In 1944, FDR spoke of housing as a right for all Americans, but in 1978 we began dismantling the Department of Housing. and Urban Development and if we take it in real dollars it's kind of equivalent to an 80% cut in the HUD budget from 1978 to today, but San Francisco is spending money on the homeless last fiscal year to the tune of 258 million dollars, some even complain that San Francisco is too generous, for example, remember the sign: "Oh, you're not even from San Francisco, why don't you try going to Antioch and get out?
They don't even have shelters or anything there and the waiting list is as long as it is here. for any type of subsidized housing, but Kosinski says that if you don't spend money on the homeless now, you'll pay more for it later, I can tell you that from someone. Who is chronically homeless and living on the streets, it can cost fifty eighty and even a hundred thousand dollars a year in medical costs, trips to the hospital. He believes a universal housing subsidy is key and for those homeless who are refusing services then they know they should be. frankly, unfortunately, once your life gets that bad, it's very difficult to save it and then once you get out on the street, it's very, very difficult to get back into San Francisco tera Moriarty KTVU Fox 2 News a lot of people are frustrated not just in San Francisco but throughout the Bay Area and they want to know what city leaders are doing to solve the homeless problem.
I feel like nothing is being done. I hate to say that I'm sure you know there are people who We're probably going to discuss that, but nothing is being done and as a result, homelessness continues to grow. I just think it's so unfair that there are so many families that are experiencing homelessness and that are spending, you know, fifty to sixty and even up to seventy-five percent of their income on rent that we have to keep talking about it. I mean, I understand how people end up passing over someone and just going to work because you end up wondering what a difference I can make, but I feel like we can't just give up and keep talking about it, all this week we'll be bringing you more stories focused on the homeless issues facing the Bay Area and next Sunday night we will be back here talking about possible solutions, please join us. for a live KTVU special at 9:00 p.m.
We will be joined by leaders from our local communities asking what is being done to get people off the streets next Sunday night live at 9:00 p.m. The ten o'clock news is next here on KTVU. Thank you very much for joining us. I hope you have a good night. See you later.

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