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Basics of Pump Maintenance w/ TPC Online Webinar | TPC Training

Jun 06, 2021
Good morning everyone, thank you for joining us for another

webinar

today, we're going to talk about humps and

pump

systems, and we'll talk a lot about the basic repair and

maintenance

of those

pump

systems, but first some cleaning items, some of the things that we're going to talk about today, I'm sure you're going to have questions and one of those questions that we always get is whether or not we can get a copy of the presentation and the answer is absolutely yes after the presentation. I will receive some follow-up emails. Just respond to those emails that come directly to me and I'll get you a copy of the presentation if you need it.
basics of pump maintenance w tpc online webinar tpc training
We will also have a recording of this on our YouTube. page and on our website so if you want that I'll be happy to get that for you too so feel free to ask for that too at the end of the show we'll have time for some Q&A so if you have those questions about Punk just put them on a small question and answer box at the bottom of your screen and we will ask you the questions and answer them without further ado. I'm going to introduce Wade Heisler, he's a teepee scene instructor here and he's going to talk a lot about pumps, so Wade takes him, mechanical instructor for TPC

training

and I spend a lot of time looking at pumps and pump systems. other people and it's a fascinating journey because I go all the way from waste treatment to water treatment, to chemical plants, refineries and things like that, and I see a lot of people scratching their heads every day, so I hope that This short

webinar

will give you an idea of ​​what we are capable of doing. when we come to your facility in an onsite or open seminar class wait a second here we go so TVC is

training

we listen

online

and start living

maintenance

training we don't just do open seminars where we conduct them in hotels around the plate around the field we also do training and I'm here at your site at your location on the maintenance side we do a lot of hands-on activities if we can if we get a chance to see your equipment and At the open seminars we sometimes do what we call a simultaneous transmission where, if you have someone you want to give a review or something like that, we can do a division of tasks in which we can incorporate you and the person you want.
basics of pump maintenance w tpc online webinar tpc training

More Interesting Facts About,

basics of pump maintenance w tpc online webinar tpc training...

I would like the training to be done, who can sit there and see what is happening on a key on a computer screen in their office or even in their own home? So we have a lot of classes like I said, but we start with that mechanical side. There's usually a little bit of housekeeping in terms of when we talk about who's qualified and a lot about demonstrated skills, knowledge and how to find the information and, most importantly to me, I think there's probably a lot of time spent at the beginning of these. classes that we do or dedicate to understanding safety and understanding, you know things that you should do, one of the things that I like to mention to people, as I always tell people, years ago there were the old rail crossings at the old railroad crossings transversals before they existed. the lights on and things like that you've had that sign on the sign it just said "stop, look and listen" and basically what we try to do and convey to people is the ability to stop looking, listen to what's happening, avoid the dangers, understanding what could happen if you did that and I always tell people you stay there for a few seconds to just look at the machine and ask yourself some questions, what is it doing, what is the operator complaining about all that kind of stuff and I always say to let people hesitate a little bit because it's better to hesitate and make a smart move than to jump in and start smashing things and only to find out that that's not really what was going on, so we like to point out that a qualified person has demonstrated skills to be able to perform the tasks at hand, the knowledge to understand where to find that information, and obviously the safety training involved so that the individual can return home safely at night and not end up hurting themselves or others. when we talk about that and part of demonstrated skills, OSHA's definition for a qualified person and you can look this up if you want includes the phrase has demonstrated skills, so this generally requires that a person can actually demonstrate the ability to perform the task.
basics of pump maintenance w tpc online webinar tpc training
Do you have the appropriate PPE? Do you use the appropriate PPE? Do you follow lockout/tagout procedures as defined by your company policies? Do you know what the responsibility of the individual is while doing it? Are you lockout and tagout on the mechanical side of the machine? he also has, if he is not qualified as an electrician, as a qualified electrician, they are properly electrically locking and tagging that device is the information transmitted to operations, proof that that machine will be out of service for a while because we are going to be working on this It is an incident where the machine failed or a supervisor performed a maintenance incident.
basics of pump maintenance w tpc online webinar tpc training
You know, all of those types of scenarios need to be addressed before anyone starts doing any work, which is why I'm always an advocate for lockout and tagout. and make sure you know where your power sources are, especially if you are working on a pump, what is the fluid you are pumping, is it a chemical, is it dangerous, if it leaks it can cause a problem, all those types of scenarios are poisonous Do I have the proper information I need to address those types of situations? So there's a lot of housework at first when we do these types of classes to talk about exactly what you need to be sure about. so you can't really cause a problem but fix a problem so jumping to the bombs side of the world everyone says you know a punk because a bomb is a punk pit bombs are usually spec'd for what they are for trying to do now what are they said the pump on the far left, the big white one that you see on your screen, that's what I call an intake pump that's actually in a waste system, a water treatment plant residuals and if I had had the necessary means and someone had stood up. next to it, but basically the centerline of that bomb was probably about six feet high, so it's a pretty good sized bomb.
Interestingly, that pump was installed years ago and works quite well; all they had to do was update the seal. and it's designed, it was putting service in the '60s. The next little pump you see is what we call a jockey pump for a fire system, so now we have a jockey pump for a fire system and a water treatment pump. waste. The difference isn't much mechanically because basically my pump is basically the sum of all its parts, it has an electric motor or a gearbox, whatever drives that thing, there are bearings involved, there are shafts involved, but they are quite different for what they do now.
I always ask the question when I look at my pump, how do I know it's doing what it's doing right? In a picture that says there was a bomb there, that's basically part of the information that we try to explain to people and it tells me where it is. my pump is working and what is it doing. Other important information is the model number, serial number, gallons per minute and feet of head, these are all very important when doing troubleshooting tasks and to be fair, that is exactly what you need. to stay completely intact and don't let the paint ninjas go crazy and paint over the label because that makes it a little difficult to get the information to repair the bomb. um, you need to get to that point now.
I'm sure everyone has seen it. one of these, if you don't have one in your facility, you'll probably come across them. the one on the far right is what we call a typical fire pump. This is what we call a split case pump. it's the same. On very basic occasions, that's the pump you want to work when you need it; Otherwise, it just sits there and becomes a maintenance item because someone comes in and says, "Hey, you know, this fire pump is squirting water everywhere." I know I have to call the day of the fire because no one else is allowed to work on it, so in those types of scenarios, you look at anything, so what's the pump doing?
Is it moving wasted within clean water? Basically, any of these three bombs you see in the picture could probably do all of the above, so while this continues with me here, wait a second, when I tell people they have to go see a bomb, the first thing I ask them . What to think about before you jump in and roll up your sleeves and start destroying everything is what a pump doesn't do what the pump is doing what is the price what is the discharge pressure on the pump if the pump is running I mean, what is the discharge pressure on the pump?
No? make it noise while it's running the nerves are sitting there humming and humming so the other question you need to know before you can calculate and do all the pressure calculations is what is the pump pumping because pumps are what we call constant head devices, so and Excuse me, as a constant head device, this pump will move the fluid so high so far, so fast and the interesting thing is that you could have a pump that generates 100 feet of head and by pumping water and a hundred feet of head, the download. The pressure would be about 43 psi if you were pumping salt water, salt water slightly heavier than water so it would be about 57 psi and if you were pumping gasoline, everyone knows that petroleum products are usually lighter than water because when you mix them, the water drops to the bottom of that gauge would read 34 psi and people tend to scratch their heads and say, "Okay, why does this pump have different pressures?
If I'm pumping different products, the answer It's usually the circuit parameter, so one of the things." What I always tell people is that the first thing you have to do is get a good pressure gauge on the inlet and discharge of your pump and that will give you an idea of ​​what the pump really is. doing most people say well I can't tell what my pump is doing because I don't have a flow meter a flow meter is a secondary element in troubleshooting in the world of pumps in many processes chemical processes flow meters flow are very important but Typically, most installations where we just pump things back and forth, maybe it's a process and I'm not really trying to understand how many gallons per minute I'm flowing.
I just move from place to place, most maintenance facilities do not carry flow meters, they are available to rent from different companies, there are companies that specifically provide those things, but I tell people they really don't need a flow meter because the pressure leaving the pump reaches the head. In other words, if I take a hundred feet of head and divide it by two point three one, I get 43 psi 43 points and I always tell people not to worry too much if the pressures are not exactly because when we talk about A little bit later here about the curves of a bomb.
A pump can operate to the right or left of the curve, but it can only operate to a certain extent to the right or left of the curve. Once I get to a certain point, I start creating tensions. in the machine that will cause premature failure of some components, so I always ask the question: what doesn't the pump do? What is the bomb doing? What is the pressure? Is the pump working? to the

basics

of troubleshooting so that I stop looking and listen to the stage, so I always have bad habits, some of my bad habits are like touching things, playing well is fine, but one has to understand before they try to touch something, right?
Are you going to get involved in this machine? Will he grab me and pull me? It's hot? All those types of scenarios, but you know, if you walk up to a piece of equipment that's working and touch some of the parts that aren't moving. You want to make sure it's not hot in those types of scenarios, but typically, if you can feel somewhat excessive vibrations coming from this machine, you probably have some kind of problem, unless the machine is designed to vibrate for that reason. I know maybe it's an extra agitator or something, some kind of conveyor system with an eccentric and it's subtle, so if everything basically has to do with the

basics

of troubleshooting, who, what, why, troubleshooting internal problems, then, when we speak. about a pump, now I have this beautiful image of this centrifugal suction pump.
The interesting part about this pump is what I tell people when we do the basics as a centrifugal pump instruction. This is what we call a cantilever impeller, so basically. the impeller just hangs on the end of the shaft and everything is held in place by those two bearings and what we call the dry side of the pump, when running a pump that normally does twofunctions, the centrifugal action creates an area of ​​less than atmospheric pressure at the inlet of the pump, which allows the atmospheric pressure that we have every day to push that liquid from the reservoir to the inlet of the pump, that's why we call it a suction side of the pump secondly, its centrifugal action delivers the pumps to the balloon and the volute is the balloon is the body casing that is around the impeller and that will normally generate a flow and the one thing I always tell the people is that pumps produce flow, they do not generate the pressure they produce. the flow necessary for pressure development, which is a function of the resistance to flow in the system, go back to some of the basic hydraulic systems in the world that we talked aboutSeveral different people, Bernoulli, in fact, we went over Bernoulli's principle, He's the reason curveballs curve and airplanes fly, but Bernoulli basically came up with the theory: If I squeeze fluid down through a restricted orifice, the velocity of the fluid increases. the pressure drops and then once I get out of that squeezed system and back into a larger section of pipe the flow slows down but the pressure goes up so Bernoulli is one of the guys I like to talk about the other one type I like.
What to talk about is Blaise Pascal and Pascal's theory is that if I apply pressure to a liquid, a closed device, an equal enclosure pressure X without decreasing in all directions, so when we talk about a hydraulic system of pumps centrifugal, there is generally no positive displacement, so we say that On the other hand, when we talk about pumps around our facilities, we may have some positive displacement pumps; In other words, if it's May, maybe the food processing industry uses low pressure pumps and screw pumps, which are usually positive displacement, so what goes into those pumps must come out of those pumps so that have pressure relief devices and pressure control devices to prevent the pump from reaching a point where the internal pressure is enough to fracture the machine, usually on a centrifugal side, that is not a problem, but if you reach to a certain point where it's not flowing as much fluid as this designer, you're flowing more fluid than it's designed for and that's when you start. pick up vibrations that tend to cause seal failure and variant failure and fluid leaks out of the pump, so that's the basics, so I understand that pumps people don't really care what they're pumping, always let it be the liquid that it does not have. any air in it and in some pumps like this one in particular it can typically only handle about 10% solids and the solids in this particular style of pump you're looking at have to be somewhat non-stringy or forced because they tend to clog. raise the impeller, so that's another thing when you get into the pump design, what are you pumping?
That is part of the questions that are asked. Well, when we talk about pressure, like I said before, that's the force of Pascal's law exerted on the walls of the container and when I see people looking at me saying, "Okay, so what really is pressure? Well, The pressure is if you used to have a can of coke that wasn't open, let's say, and everyone knows that if you had a six-pack of coke sitting on the floor and the cans weren't open, you can use them as a little stool. although it is not safe, but it actually holds the weight because the container is able to hold the liquid inside it with force. that is being pushed down on that can X equally and without decreasing in all directions and it helps you hold on, on the other hand, if that candle is empty and you stood on it, it had air in it and if you stepped on an empty can, you usually end up crushing them again because you can compress air, you can compress a gas, so from there they talk about flow rate.
Now a lot of people obsess over pump flow rates and in most cases, like I said before, I usually don't have flow meters involved in the pumping system unless it's something I have to be able to report to custody. or maybe billing purposes and things like that, so I always tell people when they look at these pumps if the pressure on the discharge side is calculated up to the head value, then you have to assume that the pump is doing what it is supposed to do and the problem is I try to get people to understand that the inlet pressure also makes a difference so the pumps are basically like you said beforehand a head device so if you had a pump that was pumping , say 90 psi and I do the calculation and it says, according to what I calculated, the gauge should be 70 psi, so if you subtract 74 MA from a hundred You realize that the inlet pressure on the side where I am the input of that pump should be about 30 psi, so that's the scenario where, well, the pumps do what they're supposed to do as we go. to talk about measured heads and work as expressed in feet and everything is based on a calculation that in a standard atmosphere a cubic foot of water measuring twelve by twelve by twelve weighs approximately sixty-two point three pounds and returning to the basic math in In the world we're talking about there are one hundred and forty-four cubic inches in one cubic foot, so if you divide those sixty-two point three pounds by one hundred forty-four you get zero point four three two pounds and to make that pound of pressure I have to take and stack two of those columns that are one by one by twelve on top of each other and I knit three on top of each other to make a pound of pressure that's why we talk about pumps or head devices the only time it doesn't come in at play is when you're looking at a fire pump because the fire pump is rated in gallons per minute and pounds per square inch of this church pressure because that's what that pump is designed to do.
In everyday industry pumps, you're basically not going to see a pressure relief number and you're going to see it at so many gallons per minute, there's so many feet ahead, so while that goes on and we're talking about density, density is something else. and yes, I identify that way, everyone knows that if you throw a cork in a bucket full of water, it will float to the surface because it is less dense than water, if we throw a stone in that same bucket, the stone sinks. the bottom because stone has a higher density and they talk about volume which is usually expressed in pounds per gallon so everyone knows the weight of a gallon of water but a gallon of Selina actually weighs much less and then I get into that. specific gravity scenario Rizla, oh my god, what are you doing right?
I talked, I talked about the lows and highs there and I always had this lovely question that I throw around: how long does Mercury wait, while everyone knows that today Mercury is one of those dangerous ones? things, but back in the day, when I was a little younger, we used to play with it in science class and that kind of fun because now, if you spill a spoonful of mercury on the ground, you usually have to call the fire department to clean it because it becomes the scene of hazardous waste, but mercury is the largest non-liquid demand and has a specific gravity of thirteen point four four and to back up, a cubic foot of mercury weighs eight hundred and forty-five pounds per cubic foot of water. away sixty two point three, so keep in mind that the specific gravity is the ratio of the density of that fluid after the viscosity but the density because petroleum products can have a high viscosity but their density is lower than that of water, so the pressure exerted on the walls of the pump is measured in pounds per square inch.
That being said, everyone understands clamps per square inch. One of the things that's coming, why shouldn't I say it's coming? One of the things that exists is the fact that a lot of equipment is used. in different parts of the world, so sometimes you're probably going to see palms per square inch and you're probably going to see the dimension of what we call a bar and what I'm going with is, as we're talking about standard atmospheres, 14.7 pounds. per square. inches and solute, so I know it's an interesting scenario, but everyone says okay, well, if I take a pressure gauge out of my box, look at it, it says zero, what is that?
Well, that's the gauge pressure, you're fourteen point seven per square inch and it moves. that's when we start talking about pressure, anything beyond fourteen point seven is considered pounds per square inch at that point, when we convert the gauge to bar, one bar is actually equal to fourteen and a half pounds per square inch, they rounded it up Why does he do this. It's easier to see, so when we talk about pressure now, well, I'll ask what is the air pressure at sea level, there we go, 14.7 PSI, that's absolute, what causes that pressure to change the climate altitude and the void.
I found a bomb. applications where it was on a laptop and this particular computer was running to supply water to a toilet on top of a mountain that is full and what was interesting is that they put this together at the bottom. of the mountain and it pumped the water very well, but when they took it to the top of the mountain it did not do that and tried to explain the elevation to someone. You know that the amount of elevation change caused the pump to cavitate, so that's another Open Topic, that's one of my thrown out questions that I asked when I was doing this training.
I've asked people who know what cavitation is and nine times out of ten the students in the class usually answer well, it's air, well that's not entirely true. It's steam and it's caused by boiling water because I made too much of a vacuum against that liquid, so when we talk about heads, a pressure measurement is expressed in feet. This is what I explained a little before, cubic feet of water contains four point seven, sorry, seven point four eight gallons of water that weigh sixty-two point three pounds. I do those calculations and I get point four three two pounds, so if I want to look to see exactly what the dimension of a pound is. of water, there are actually two of those columns with 0.3, one placed on top.
Now one of the things I like to see when I look at pump systems is that the top gauge would be what we call a suction pressure gauge, that's where we would put it. at the pump inlet, if you had an inlet pressure higher than about 25 or 20 psi continuously, you'd obviously want to use a positive gauge if you're drawing liquid from an open container, that's where I'd look. on a suction gauge so you know it's just preference and one of the things I tell people when they're trying to troubleshoot a pump and a lot of people tell me today, yeah, you know, I'm going to have pressure. pressure gauge I don't have a pressure gauge, well, you know, it's one of those tools that needs to be kept in a place that's reliable so you can get good, reliable readings all the time.
There are now several different ways to install permanent pressure gauges in the pumping system. systems, but I always tell maintenance people that if you're working on a pump, make sure you have a good gauge capable of using it so you can read exactly what the pump is doing because I see customers will put in a lot of applications. gauges and systems and don't constantly operate against the pressure and over a period of time the gauge will tend to mechanically come off the set in a bad mood, so if I were sitting down I'll tell you how I find the pressure on this.
What I take is this data plate here and we're looking at this flow, Mr. Pump, and the interesting thing is that some pump manufacturers will put a lot of information on this information. It's good, this information should be saved somewhere you can find it. and identify it and where the maintenance staff can get to it now if you look at this, take the place of the data and take the pressure of the head that is maintained with a little arrow pointing to it, it says 184 feet per head that says 180 four point seven . so you can go 184 185.
I'm not too crazy because if the pump is doing what you see in the calculation up here, 184 divided by two point three one is seventy-nine point six five psi, then if your gauge is reading 77 76 80 81 82 83 um, the pump runs normally where it belongs on the curve, but now that I go to this pump and I'm having problems with the pump seals and I see that my pressure is quite low, let's say my pressure is around the 40 range at 50 psi, now a couple of things come into play: the pump is actually trying to move more fluid than possible and can start to create vibrations that will cause seal and bearing failure, which is why I always tell the people that is always a good idea to understand if I have psi I am going to multiply by two point three one to see how many my feet are per head if I have a head I am going to divide it by two point three one and you also have to take into account specific things gravity now the interesting part about this Caddy pump it says reform s-- reflux divider in the question I would ask someone okay what is being reformed is it some type of mixed material if it is a type of mixed material what is its specific gravity because that in would actually affect the calculation, as cansee there, you take the head and you divide it by two point three one, but you also divide it by the specific gravity, and everything in the pump world is based on water and has a specific gravity in the pump. one oil, so typically in a water application, don't even go crazy about specific gravity, the only time that would come into play is if you were pumping salt water, so one of the four verbal questions I get on this in winter and then Spring is that my cooling system has water and I put glycol in it to prevent it from freezing in the winter.
Does that change the specific gravity? Well, the answer is that this black hole is generally lighter than water and is actually solvent. ' or it can be hydrated by water, so it actually takes on the specific gravity of water, so they talk about flow rate where we talk about the volume of fluid passing from a point most of the time if it is the discharge pressure. unless the suction pressure matches the head on the label and the pump you have to assume the pump is actually doing what it's supposed to do if I've lost flow that will affect my head so your pressure will be lower, For example. a satirical Bombs are a wonderful little thing.
I identify with that, as you know, when I was young, everyone remembers when they used to have merry-go-rounds in the playgrounds and you would stand in the middle and he would be nice and dandy and then he started walking towards the edge, some tropical forests tend to try to blow you off the merry-go-round, so on each pump you will get the flow rate and the pump head, those are the two most important specifications. Well, those are the things that will tell you what your bombs are supposed to do. In this particular image, what we have here is: Is your pump working?
That's a good question, the answer is yes, that's great, if the answer is no, it's like Oh, now what do I do? It's time to panic. Well, no, not quite, because it's time to find the pump curve. If you can't find the pump label, you can find the pump curve. That will tell you the same thing that is on the page. Label now on this particular image here, this is typically what we would call a standard multi shear pump curve. What it shows me is the minimum size and color that can be put in this housing and it shows me the maximum size of the impeller.
I could put in this case, the engineer who designed this particular application was looking for 800 gallons per minute at 120 feet forward, so if I did that calculation and 120 feet forward there with me for a second, yeah, the pressure gauge coming out of that pump should Say around 51 or 52 psi, what that will tell me is that my pump is working where it belongs. Wow, if I came back to you and said hmm, okay, my pump isn't generating that pressure. Well, there's more pressure if I look at that curve and look at the fact that I can go from 120 to 160, so if you divide the difference between the two, you're probably about 15 feet further ahead, so that would be about 135 feet. head. you divide that by 2.31 now my gauge should read around 60 psi what that will tell me is that there is something that is reducing the flow in the system and once I start to get to that point where I am all the way to the left of That curve shows what we call the big red line, which is the point of no return if the fluid flow were reduced by cutting off the discharge and went from those 200 gallons per minute to less than 200 gallons per minute.
The pump would actually physically stop moving that liquid and you wouldn't start heating it, so that's the kind of thing I try to tell people now when you notice those green lines where the red line is at right angles. it's between well 84, that's what we call the sweet spot or the PEP or Mike's hump, so when I get that 50 51 52 psi pressure, I know I'm pulling the herd in gallons per minute 120 feet ahead of that bomb. I shouldn't give me any problems, but that's one thing now, if I go there and the pressures really drop, then I'll take that red right angle curve and start moving it towards 76 72-68. percentage range when I start doing that, these are stresses that cause seal failure, bearing damage, vibration, cavitation in some applications.
I have even seen that the motor driving the pump does not have enough power to handle what is happening, in this case. and I was in a situation where I was called to troubleshoot a pump system and this person said to me, "Oh, you had a problem with these pumps" and I said "okay, so tell me what's going on here" and He said well, I'm on my third pump. I'm like, wow, you're on your third pump and how long did he say in three days and I'm like, okay, what's going on? He says, well, he's popping the overloads in the motor, so the motors kick in and I come back and restart it and it runs for about half an hour and 45 minutes and it does it again.
My electrician said he drew too many amps, so that's fine, so tell me a little about what the pumps are supposed to do, you know? the part number or something so I could get information, it all came to light that this pump was supposed to make about 40 gallons per minute at about 160 feet ahead, so I asked the proverbial question: how long is the pipe? suction? How big is the download? pipe, how many thousands, so many fittings and all that, and with what he explained to me on the phone, he only had six feet of suction pipe and six feet of elevation difference and six feet back to the tank, so he had nothing close by .
This was one hundred and eighty feet ahead on the resistance side of the pump, so it actually pushed the pump beyond its power limits and it was physically drawing too many amps, so just to verify that I told the person on the other side of the phone. I said you have a dump valve on that thing, he says, yeah, he's right here on the tank. I said okay. I said reset the surges and start closing that relief valve and tell me what happens with the amperage drop and so on as soon as he. he did that, he came back to me and said wow, that's great.
I started to close the discharge after the amperage started to drop and I said yeah, I said that's what I thought, you know you were in trouble, you were in what we call a runaway. So the pump was trying to move more fluid than it was physically capable of and that's the only thing that people have a hard time understanding, so I always tell people that it's kind of interesting when you look at these things from this point of view. , so first when it was all over and I finished the words, I asked the person the question in the ovens, so how long did the old pump last and he said how about eleven or twelve years and I said well, no in that application it says oh no no no, does it say that?
The pump was usually about three hundred and four hundred feet away from the tank. He says that when we installed it in the plant we had three. We had three phase power near the tank so we moved the pump right next to the tank so many times. Problems will arise in the pumps that you have in a system that runs for a long time and then something happens where I have to move and people don't do the calculations or the friction calculations to understand the physical characteristics and what the pumps are capable of. to do it now, the nice thing about this little curve here is what we call the example of where you want to be, so as you see there, I highlighted the best efficiency point of this curve with that little orange arrow and the dotted line for the left is what we call my minimum flow letter, then we put this little red line here, this is what we call percentage reliability, as long as my pump operates within that percentage reliability mark read on the curve, this will probably be a bomb. that you'll probably have to go out and look and make sure no one is taking it because it won't perform well and it probably won't give you much trouble.
I can't speak to it on the mechanical side, but physically on the pump side, if I run this pump at this point, that's good, now I mean the mechanical side when you have an N suction centrifugal pump where you have a motor, you have a coupling, you have a set of bearings and you have your pump, that's where problems can deviate if you don't align the pump, even though your pumps are running at the point of best efficiency you can still have a lot of problems as you can see as you go to the right the bearing is a little low. seal and bearing life as you go counterclockwise to get discharge recirculation, you get suction recirculation, you get low bearing and seal life, so it's kind of a tradeoff, but the only thing that people have a hard time getting The word cavitation is interesting because certain pump applications are designed in some way to operate in cavitation and, having said that, there are some details that go into it and I always tell people that the best example is to take a look at a pool pump if If you look at a pool pump, pool pumps are usually a plastic body pump and plastics can actually tolerate impact, damage the dose of cavitation inside the pump, so normally That is the reason why the pool pump you have at home for your pools is made of plastic. and then that plastic is actually called Morelos, actually nifty thermoplastic, so obviously if we go down that path, that other little blue line that I just promoted there would be the line that your pump takes from zero our containers to their point of best efficiency, so if something changed in the speed of that motor, maybe it had resistance in the bearing or something or someone came in and said, oh, let's put a VFD on this because we can save energy and then the other guy says, well, you know, these bombs.
If you load too much, we will slow down this pump, usually, what will happen if I reduce the speed of this pump to the VFD? In fact, I can pull this line towards that blue and follow that line down so that it becomes a point right at the bottom or that blue line intersects the red line. I wouldn't want to run that pump below that speed because I'd start to have some difficulties with it, so it's an interesting way to look at a curve and for those of you. They are a little confused by all this.
I like to use this thing we call the baseball bat analogy. This came from there, oh God. I don't even remember where the hell I found this years ago, but I tell people that if you look, if you have a baseball bat in your hand and you're hitting the ball if the pitcher makes your pitch and you hit the ball with your hands, that's fine. , it's going to hurt, so we say operation below that point, damage or result and then as you go beyond the handle and start working on the neck of the band or the reduced area of ​​the band that caused the throat, you will get vibration levels that will increase, you will have efficiency losses, you will have higher maintenance costs.
I'm going to have problems with the seal and things like that, so if I swing the bat in that area, I'll usually end up with a foul ball or a fly ball or something like that, and as you get into that area we call the allowed operating region, that's where the pump starts doing what it's supposed to do and then in the world of baseball that's when you start getting a base header double or triple and of course obviously if I hit the ball and it's the sweet spot that leaves the park and we have a home run and everyone else is good, if I can operate my pump continuously at that sweet spot on the bat or at the sweet spot on the curve, then my pump will be what I call a good performer, something it's going to last a long time, so with that being said, of course, I'd be asleep when you get past that sweet spot, you get stuck on triples, doubles, base hits and then from the end of the bag you get foul balls, so there You got it, excuse me, problem solving like I tell people doesn't hurt you, you don't wake up one morning and someone says your problem solver is one of those things where you have to ask yourself a bunch of questions like who what why? what where and how pumps are pumped the first part of troubleshooting is identifying if there is a problem and identifying if there is a problem is one of those interesting things so anyway first identify the problem you need to look at the system, you have to know what it's like As a person coming in from the outside and looking at a pumping system, I try to look at everything that the whole system works, from what is your supply, what is it pumping, is it a closed loop process, is it in a open circuit. process, what pumps are supposed to do is pump cavitation, cavitation takes the form of a noise and I like to tell people that it's like the cavitation noise actually depends on the size of the pump and , with that being said, you look at it and let's say, how big is this pump?
If it is a large pump used in waste treatment plants, we have six foot inlets and outlets. It sounds like he's trying to grind himself with some bowling balls. If it is a smaller bomb, it will rattle. as if it had some stones running inside. In fact, an HVAC guy once told me that he took apart a pump three times because he thought he hadstones and every time I cooked the party I couldn't find it. I didn't realize it was cavitation, so it's the pump that's leaking, the bearings make noise, a noise in the bearings happens in a different field, cavitation misalignment and that kind of thing happens at a certain point of vibration.
Bearings can have a pump with perfectly low vibration, but a bearing. it may be making a noise so it falls into a different step, so ask yourself what the pump is not doing. The second step is to try to find the current pump information, where do I find it? Where is? I am the bomb label. the equipment identification number at the facility sends you to a page where you can find that information, how the pump is identified at your location, use this as a starting point, the other thing I tell people when they are troubleshooting with a pump is that they can get their Check the maintenance information from the maintenance locks to see what was done to this pump last time.
You may find that this pump has this problem more than once in your life. Now suddenly my pumps are problematic. Ok, now how can you isolate the problem? between mechanical hydraulic well mechanical is what the pumps tell you sound, sight and smell is the pump when loading are the bearings that make noise all these are things that point to problems that occur in a piece of equipment now excuse me in this image that we have I have a couple of vibration tools that are easily accessible for some money, obviously we don't get more, in fact the one in the top right corner is the Fluke 812 which is actually a recordable meter attack that will actually record and you can download it so you can keep an eye on the machine and be able to do trends on the little meter on the left side it says TP TP 890 80 or 90 70.
Those are what we call point of use vibration tools. What they do is focus on the vibration and the inches per second or the units of damage that are being done or done to the bearings now the vibration of the machine is how much it is moving, that is, it is overeating, which is go up there and say point seven three iso and then at the bottom it says bearing damage units or what the condition of the bearings is. The idea is that the maintenance person can easily identify if the problem is a vibration or if the problem is obvious, for example so these are some of the things that are useful in the field and the technology has come down quite a bit. in the cost years ago that machine in the middle called the live expert that little guy there as simple as it seems probably at some point was a twenty five or thirty thousand dollar tool and in some cases that's a little hard to justify, well, es TPI ninety eighty ninety seventy meters costs between four hundred and six hundred dollars, depending on the version you buy, now it becomes a tool that is relatively easier to acquire and use because it is quite simple, it just gives you some baselines.
It's not a definite meter or something you would use long term to record vibrations and machines, but like I said, the technology has gone down a lot, so another thing is that I tell people how often do you check the lube level, grease , the burns. things believe it or not, too much grease, Matis is no better than blueberries, some small pumps use bushings, a good example of that is if you get circulator pumps in your facility, we used to call the old Bell and Gossett three piece ones. pumps those things have bushings in the motor and they had bushings in the pump section in the motor outside the pump section of the pump they have sleeves with oil wick lubrication their pumps have grease fittings how much breeze do I put on it?
There is also a lot of fat, not enough fat? That's actually been down to a science as well and that little website that you have right there that I put there on the page like www scene lubrication comm and what that will do is take you to a website. and you can see some of the information that's in there about how to lubricate things. When we look at the mechanical part of the pump, we see how the pump is coupled to the controller. Is the pump engaged? A closed torque pump uses bearings. of the motor, if it is a motor with a flexible coupling between them, we normally have a set of bearings, so now instead of two bearings we have four bearings.
Have the pump and coupling been aligned correctly? What type of alignment processes do I use? Am I using a dial? Gauge by using a dual dial gauge by using an alignment roller, a lot of these things again, like I said, like vibration, this equipment has actually significantly reduced costs and become easier to acquire as well that the other thing I tell people: do we have a loose, do we have a loose mounting foot, do we have a soft foot, are there any shims missing, what is mechanically vibrating in the pump, then another thing is they can get into trouble and I had this conversation and a waste treatment plant a couple of months ago are the valves in the correct position are stuck are broken are partially closed has the viscosity of the fluid changed the temperature the chemical composition what is the pump doing how does it sound is it cavitating the sound normally it will tell you that the bearings are in cavitation there is a difference between a dry bearing and a capitated pump, is there a basket filter on a suction line?
Those are always those big no's, people put baskets and coaches and systems in and don't take them out and clean them every now and then, so they usually show up. There is a low pressure indication on the suction side, so there are a lot of things to think about when you start to have a hydraulic problem at the pump. Now that you have information, what do you do? Look around the bomb. Do you see leaks? If so, what happens? the leak is oil leaking or leaving it on the edge of the pump is liquid dripping from the pump air is not coming out of the pump generally speaking, pumps applied in the correct application will run for a long time if they are maintains and I always say that people do not assume that pump was replaced it is the same as the original follow the paper trail go back to the maintenance information I have been to many facilities where they had replacement pumps, the problem lies in whether a pump that application was cut and it was taken out of service and then the pump just liked it with a different impeller cut it was replaced with that pump now it probably had some problems maybe it pumped too much or too little so that's all kinds of information . that needs to be filed, that's why I say follow the paper trail, so if you haven't set up a regular maintenance schedule, now might be a good time to think about it, there's a lot of information on the web, some of it is good. some are not so good do your homework ask your pump professional find a reliable pump the competitor you can work with once you have established a maintenance schedule for your pump keep it up because once you understand what a pump does and How to maintain it will actually save you quite a bit of money, so obviously you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.
We offer multiple instructor-led training courses on pumps and pumping systems, that would be more of a why. Do I use this type of pump for this application? One of the most popular classes we do is pump maintenance and repair. We talked a little bit about pump curves, but we basically dealt with maintenance of alignment bearings and that kind of stuff outside of that. doing what we call troubleshooting rotating mechanical equipment that goes into the gearboxes, drives the couplings, alignment scenarios like that and then of course on the other side of the mechanics we talk about understanding and troubleshooting the system hydraulic, so with that being said, I think this is where John comes in.
Okay, thank you very much, hold on, so if you have any questions about something you're working on specifically, maybe a pump at your facility, feel free to scroll down and on your screen you'll see a question and answer box. there, just enter that. And in the meantime, we'll answer those questions as we file to return. If you need to copy the presentation, you will receive a follow-up email from this webinar. Simply reply to that email. Let me know. If you would like a copy of the presentation, either in PDF format or if you would like the link to upload the actual video, I am happy to send it to you as well, but we can ask for that.
We are still waiting and asking questions. to come wait, do you have any last minute advice? any kind of parting words you want to share before those questions come. Well, a lot of people will take a bit of pomp for granted when they put it on an application at work and the interesting thing is to talk to a real pump engineer, he will tell you that it's not as easy as you think, you have to know what you've done. , you have to know a lot of things and like I said before, if you get a good pump, one that's very reliable, one that gives a lot of information, that's the kind of people you want to keep around you, if the first thing that comes out of your mouth from the pump seller is good, I'll have to take a look at it.
I contact you and then you wait several days and someone else calls you and starts asking you a bunch of questions. I kind of questioned his abilities, but that being said, this is one of those things where the Internet is a huge information highway, but so is the Internet. It also has a lot of misinformation so be careful when you look at things because I know YouTube websites tend to know if it's the manufacturer, you're good, you're in good standing, that's Joe and Billy Bob's YouTube. video presentation that questioned its quality, so Wayne, what common problems have happened to pumps?
Do you see that most people overlook it because they either don't know it, they don't know it? You think it's a big deal or you know it's just something. that they miss, is there something that people just missed because they don't think it's a big deal, but it turns out to be a big deal? Well, that's based in a way, John, it's based on the answer and the question, you know what? What are you doing with this bomb? And you know, obviously, if it's a waste treatment plant, it becomes a really big problem because you're not going to pick up the phone and call the radio station and tell everyone in town to stop dumping the trash. toilet chain. because that's not going to happen, so when maintenance issues arise on a system like that, there's usually some backup involved, but again there's a lot of misinformation when it comes to a lot of those things and I see a lot of pumps that are being serviced. but they are not being repaired.
Miller's words, I get guys telling me, oh yeah, you know this seal here on this pump lasts about two or three months and I'm replacing it again, so those kinds of scenarios are things that I tell him he might have some kind of hydraulic or mechanical problem because I always tell people that the seal and the pump are like what we used to call the canary in the mine shaft, the miners used to take it down the shaft. the mine shaft with them and if the canary collapsed and that usually meant you're in a bag of poison gas and you need to get out of the mine, so I tell people that the bomb seal is probably the first thing they You are going to realize it and it will be the first problem they will see when a pump starts giving them problems.
Okay, we're waiting for a couple more questions to come in. I'll give you a little more time beforehand. We sign off here, but wait, you know? Tell me what the average life of a pump is and do you know if it is the seal that tends to fail first or what is the problem area that you find in your experience. Well, that is a very interesting topic. because how long should a pump last, I refer to it as an old fashioned question, it depends when I say I'm actually being very serious because it depends on what you are doing it depends on your installation it depends on the plumbing it depends on is it Are they doing fluid changes?
It depends on the maintenance procedures. Are we greasing it correctly? Are we greasing it too much? Execution is based on an equation that dates back to the 1930s and is actually the physical equation of work. 10% of all bearings fail and the remaining 90% last 8 to 10 times longer. It's called the l 10 equation, l 10 sympathetic bearing, and it's a fascinating topic because engineering students all over the country always get this from their engineering professor and say, "Okay, here's the Palmgren x equation." Try to break it down and see if you can come up with something different and they continually try to attack this. equation and it's still standing and by 1930 so it's an interesting scenario again it depends on what the pump is put through and whether it's maintained or not so that's the type of questions so if I take care of my pump , I do what the manufacturer recommends that I follow the engine manufacturers recommendations.
In those types of scenarios, you'll probably have a pump that works fine, it probably won't give you many problems, but if problems arise, that's when you start to ask what's going on. With that in mind, is therecertain industries or pump applications that you find tend to present more problems than others? I would like to answer it in a kind of statement and that will tell you that you know it all depends. In the surrounding environment I have seen pumps and food processing facilities that were terribly maintained and people didn't understand what they were supposed to do.
I've seen pumps and waste treatment plants that were terribly maintained and suddenly someone really realized why this is happening, then they started looking at it and you say, well, we don't have the qualified people to work on this, we assume we just because this guy is a mechanic, he understands how to maintain a pulp. so there's a lot of problems, I mean there's really nothing specific. I've been in facilities where everything was meticulously maintained and they still had some issues with some applications, so that's one of those, I guess it goes back in history, it all depends on the job.
Well, I think we've reached the end of our time, hold on everyone. I want to thank you very much for joining us again. If you need a copy of any other material, please let us know and we will sign you off. Take care of yourselves. everyone well have a great day guys

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