YTread Logo
YTread Logo

Are Baby Venomous Snakes Dangerous?!

Are Baby Venomous Snakes Dangerous?!
- Got a

baby

fer-de-lance right here. - Now, on this curled up pose like that you can see this S-shaped design. That snake is ready to launch and strike. (dramatic music) Tonight, we're in Costa Rica exploring one of our favorite wildlife preserves. This location is incredibly biodiverse, which means there are countless species that we can come across. I'm going to attempt the grand slam of night herping and if you don't know what that is, I'm about to show you. In baseball, a grand slam is defined as a home run with the bases loaded and it counts for four runs. On tonight's adventure, I'm redefining the grand slam as I attempt to find not four but five unique species, an insect, an arachnid, a frog, a lizard and if we're lucky, a snake. So, if you guys are ready, let's see what we can find. - Grand slam. - Got a lizard right here, look at this. That is a Costa Rican, green anole right there. Holy cow, I have never caught this species before and there's no given that I'm gonna catch it now. Look at that, it's asleep hanging right down off of that fallen leaf. Wow, look at how vibrant green it is, it looks just like a leaf hanging down. I might be able to use my snake tongs to gently lift this fallen leaf up and off of this branch. Okay, let me check this under brush, make sure there's no fer-de-lance. Last thing I wanna do is step on a

venomous

snake. See all this dense brush here. You get excited about a lizard and before you...
are baby venomous snakes dangerous
know it, you step on something that's gonna bite you and possibly kill you. All right, let me see. (tense music) It's working. That is the Costa Rican green anole, an absolutely beautiful species. Now, this lizard was just asleep and that's because they are primarily, okay, I'm just gonna go ahead and catch him at this point before he gets away. Ooh, look at those little teeth. Now this is primarily a diurnal species, which means they're out hunting under the light of day. At night they keep themselves hidden in trees so that they can avoid any potential predation. I'm gonna slightly readjust it so that we can get a better look. Oh gosh, there's a little bite right there, those are some sharp teeth. Okay, there we go, readjusted the lizard. Now, you'll notice those big eyes. These have incredible eyesight. They're primarily feast upon insects. You can see that really long tail, nearly twice the length of its body, used to help balance this lizard when it's up in the trees. All right, well, how cool's that? Costa Rican green anole, we officially count that as the first run of the night in my attempt to hit the night herping grand slam. All right, I'm gonna actually climb back up this hillside and put the lizard in the tree that it was sleeping in. (dramatic music) Okay, we've got a red-eyed leaf frog just out here in front of me by about 10 feet. And whenever you handle an amphibian, you wanna make sure that you've got...
are baby venomous snakes dangerous
moisture on your hands so that you don't actually draw the moisture out of their skin. (dramatic music) Got him, ever so gently. There it is, the red-eyed leaf frog. Obviously, this frog gets its name from those brilliantly red eyes. And you'll notice those vertical pupils. These frogs have incredible eyesight at night and during the day they will cling to the underside of leaves to keep them hidden from predators. But at night like this, they're out in full force, feasting on pretty much any insect that they can come across. And when you think of amphibians in Costa Rica, the red-eyed leaf frog is, without question, the most famous frog species that we have here in country. Look at those beautiful red toes. Now each one of those toes has a little sticky pad on it that allows them to easily move throughout the environment. You can see the bright blue and yellow coloration just on the underside of the back legs there. Let me see if I can get it to actually walk out onto my other finger... Actually, just jumped on your camera, don't move. Let me see if I can get him back over here. There we go. I'm always excited anytime we come across a red-eyed leaf frog here in Costa Rica. I would definitely say that this species counts as our frog for the night. We are off to one fantastic start. Okay, we're about to check off the arachnoid run for the night. That is a tailless whip scorpion, about the most nightmarish looking creature you can come across, but...
are baby venomous snakes dangerous
believe it or not, they're completely harmless, not

venomous

, not poisonous, no stinger, no fangs. And the way they eat things is they have these crab-like grappling hook forearms that they just grab onto their prey with and shove it right into their mouth. You wanna know why I think they're so creepy? Watch this. The second I make contact with one of those little legs, it's going to dart back into that tree. Oh look, it's reaching out it's little antenna to sense me. (dramatic music) Wow, you see how fast that thing moved? Living nightmare number 101 right there. Oh, this is great, that is a stick bug. Now this insect is not going to move if I don't make contact with it. It is completely relying on its camouflage at the moment. And here comes some sort of daddy long legs spider crawling right up next to it. Let's see, I'm gonna gently get it up onto my hand so we can take a closer look. I don't have to worry about being bitten or stung, these guys are completely harmless, here we go. All right buddy, you can get up on my hand and you stay still for a second. There we go. And there are a number of different stick bug or walking stick species here within Central and South America. And I couldn't tell you exactly which variety this is, but some of them can grow up to nearly two feet in length. Each and everyone has a unique design to it which helps keep it perfectly hidden within the environment. All right, I'm gonna let him back up...
onto the tree here. Well, I would say that that definitely counts as our insect of the night. What are these old rotted boards leaned up here? Be a good spot for things to hide behind. Oh, there's a scorpion, look at this, kind of tops are earlier arachnid. I feel like we should try to take a look at that guy. Now, I am not super familiar with the potency of the scorpion species here in Central America, so this is not an arachnid that I wanna get stung by. But it's in a really great position for me to be able to just gently get a hold of the end of its tail and see if I can slowly work it out. Oh no, oh no. Ah, it literally got right into this hole in the ground. Yep, he's coming right up, coming right up and out of the hole. There is our scorpion and actually the better play here, might be for me to just let him up and onto this leaf. Oh no, he's stinging. Got him, there we go. That is a forest scorpion of some sort. Now, I'm guessing that the venom of this scorpion is on the toxic side, considering the fact it has very small, very slender pinchers. The rule of thumb is that if a scorpion has slender pinchers, less crushing power, which means that the sting is going to be more potent. You can see just how razor sharp that stinger is, right on the tip of the telson, is not a venom that I think I wanna experience. Very cool, I think I'm going to actually take a tailless whip scorpion off the list and count this as our arachnid of the night. All right,...
now let's get this creepy crawly back up into its little borough. - Got a

baby

fer-de-lance right here. - Nice, this is gonna officially be our snake of the night. What's crazy is that when fer-de-lance are babies, the little tip of their tail is yellow and they will use that to lure in prey. They'll just sit in leaves, completely camouflaged, wiggle that back and forth, something will come close. They can strike out and then they've got a meal. There we go, see if I can just... Oh, that's perfect like that. Get a real good look at just how cryptic that coloration is. This snake would be so well hidden in the leaves. Now even as a very small juvenile like this, this snake is still incredibly

dangerous

. Its venom is just as potent as an adult. And while the venom yield may not be as high, it would still be a medical emergency. See that puffing up its body saying, "Okay, now I'm gonna get into hidden defense pose, puff myself up a little bit so I look bigger. I'm intimidating, you don't wanna mess with me." No, we certainly do not wanna get any closer than this. Now, this may be a young of the year and the females are ovoviviparous which means that they give birth to live young. The eggs actually develop inside of the snake, hatch within its belly and then are birthed live. Now, on this curled up pose like that, you can see this S-shaped design, that snake is ready to launch and strike. And the little wiggle of the tail, right there is...
basically warning that says, "Don't get any closer." See that, even you jumped, even you jumped. Wow, that snake literally launched itself from up on top of the rock right down into the spot. Like I said, that is about as close as I wanted to get. And I would say this is probably a good point to wrap up this episode. We came out tonight hoping to hit the grand slam of herping. We've come across an insect, an arachnid, a frog, a lizard and finally, last but not least, the teeniest tiniest little fer-de-lance, our snake of the night. - Grand slam. - I'm Coyote Peterson, be brave, stay wild. We'll see you on the next adventure. Now, all right, buddy, we're gonna let you off into the night, I'm gonna go this direction. (dramatic music)