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Actresses Roundtable: Jennifer Lopez, Scarlett Johansson, Renée Zellweger, Lupita Nyong'o | Close Up

Actresses Roundtable: Jennifer Lopez, Scarlett Johansson, Renée Zellweger, Lupita Nyong'o | Close Up
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-up with the Holly reporter

actresses

I'm Rebecca Ford and I'd like to welcome Laura Dern

Lupita

Nyong

'o Renee

Zellweger

aquafina

Scarlett

Johansson

and

Jennifer

Lopez

thank you so much for joining us so we're gonna jump right in here when were you most afraid or intimidated by a role and how did you overcome it we can all probably relate that it happens every time before you start yep it happens every time your imposter syndrome who sneaks in and you're gonna be found out and this will be the time that everyone knows you're a fraud and you're fired and you know I don't know it's always this wonderful exciting collaboration and you don't want to let anybody down so you know you just have this little nurse and want to make sure you hold up your end of the deal it becomes less of fear then and probably more just a sense of responsibility as you I guess get older and I've been doing it a while but it's it's always part of the joy of it really because if it doesn't frighten you excited exactly why are you doing it scare you learn was there one specific maybe that scared you more than most I know I would say I mean to your point and scare you scare the out of you probably the most scared I've been is when I'm having the most fun because it is so boundary-less and you kind of lose sight of where you are and that's an amazing feeling but specifics in the moment probably I did film Citizen Ruth and...
actresses roundtable jennifer lopez scarlett johansson ren e zellweger lupita nyong o close up
that was the I felt at the time the most different of anyone I'd been with I mean not that I'm not addicted to having pain but if that was a challenge and at that time felt scary to me and because it was a very dark comedy I'm trying to sort of walk this unusual line and the script was so fun and terrifying beautiful I would say that the last film us terrified me quite a bit every time I work I wonder whether I have what it takes to do that particular row because you know we're in a business where we're always starting again you know you have to you start with ignorance with every role and the preparation is about moving from that ignorant to hopefully a sense of you know expertise by the time the film wraps right but with us I had to play two characters in one movie and I had the time it usually takes me to prepare for one and these two characters are diametrically opposed to each other they are individual but they're also two entities that ultimately are one so that was a challenge just in terms of how to organize it in my head you know and how to how to make them distinct and yet feel like two parts of one entity I think you're always kind of excited and at the undertaking of a new role a new movie and I've done them for so long and all a lot of us have here that you're not nervous nervous there's like butterflies but it's not manner it's not like oh yeah I'm gonna go down in flames it's not that nervous but this was...
actresses roundtable jennifer lopez scarlett johansson ren e zellweger lupita nyong o close up
the first time in a long time that I was actually terrified to do that opening number which I suggested it was my fault that I was scrim it just says Ramona finishes a final flourish and then me and destiny meet and I was like no she's like the big you know kind of the moneymaker at the club she was this person I played a stripper in that in this movie and um and I was like but she has to show why like we can't say it we have to do it right we have to I have to dance on the pole I have to show them I have to go there and even though that's scary and in my mind I think it's gonna be scary but it but then when I was there and I have the dental floss on and I'm out there like in a way I've never been it was so scary it was so terrifying I was literally like for the first time in years like my heart beating out of my chest and going I'm really scared and I wasn't smiling like I am out I turned to my producing partner and she's walking onto stage and everybody's excited and it was toward the end of the shoot and here we go towards the stage and I have my robe on and there's 300 extras oh man and it's like oh my god okay and I go I turn to my mom I'm scared you know and she was like you are never hears me say that right I heard like we just like working working working doing our thing show movie and I was like yeah and she was like you got this you got this and I'm like yeah I got this but I think that was putting myself out...
actresses roundtable jennifer lopez scarlett johansson ren e zellweger lupita nyong o close up
there in a way physically and emotionally I kind of I don't know something deeper than I had ever done and playing a character that was that unapologetic in so many ways that it was so different than who I was you know I feel like all my characters they have a little bit of me in them and this one did a little bit but it was so different yeah it was again the most it comes out to be the most rewarding thing that you do is like oh okay cool paint off that scene is amazing how who could helped you to choreograph it and how long you did it and how many people actually saw you do it before it's 300 male audience member sad so funny hardly any say you're sorry I wasn't quiet my face probably that that's why - and and it was hard it was you know I had to learn the acrobatics and so you know like the shoulders will build up to it so it took like we started like eight weeks out and she started just showing me I had a pole teacher who worked for Cirque de Soleil so she but she lived in Vegas so she kind of knew the strip clubs so I was like you know this has to be like I'm not trying to at Cirque du Soleil performer I'm a stripper and so it has to have that grunt that kind of like dirty sexy grimy you know feel to it too like I want it to be that too and so we kind of just put it together that with the moves that I learned and I was like god this is a great one or you know I need to I need to conquer that one so I need to learn that one because that one has...
to be in there and we kind of put it together together and then it was like from doing research and going to the strip clubs you know there was moves I saw some of the girls do I was like I'm gonna put that and we just kind of I just kind of constructed it piece by piece and then you know we picked a song and we just we just did it in that way but it was it was uh it was it was hard and I think you're right I didn't realize I was in that small space with just a few people the director hadn't even seen it she only saw a video of it like the day before and then you know I went out and did it on the day and

Scarlett

what about you you have two very different films that are that have come out is there one that was sort of more intimidating for you than the other I don't know if intimidated is really the right word exactly I think both of those films even though they're really different and the thing they do have in common is that the scripts were like beautiful little gems both scripts and Warren obviously marriage story and it was such a it was incredible I mean it's just every I think what people that have seen it don't necessarily realize is that every hesitation and every unfinished sentence is all scripted and no one's really you know it's the words are the words and you know you have to stick together it's all right there and you and he's he's a real stickler about that you know which is fine but you know you you have to...
you you have this kind of structure and and and then you figure it out it was challenging at times just because you know know is relentless and he works you know until like to exhaustion I've never really been able to have that experience there's burning film like that it's something you do when you do theater because you you know you just keep coming it's one of the beautiful things about doing theater is that you get that chance over and over again to figure it out and you do what you figure it out you know every night and it's so exciting because you have you know surprise yourself all the time and you're stuck with this tap you know with this text and that's kind of the experience that I certain Lana and Laura had to is you know you're you had all this all this offer this opportunity to just try it all out and it was it was challenging but it also you kind of keep coming back to okay I can't stray from this so I I'm I'm gonna you know make these discoveries within this kind of con the confines of this tax and it was it wasn't out I wouldn't say intimidating but it was it was challenging definitely I was intimidated when I read your monologue watched you tirelessly learning it fumble through and know my god and then make up an air and he would run lines and I would listen to you memorizing it and take one was flawless this human being opening her heart and telling this entire story not one word v I was just mesmerized it...
was amazing to watch you do all the actors were hands I when Noah walked past yeah it was amazing I think acting is all it is that's all about you know what you have with another person that's the magic that happens is what you get from some the this person receiving you and you receiving them and and the you know the making this beautiful shape with somebody else and I of course had this beautiful creature to to act opposite and be there present with me and hold me and you know this incredibly like sympathetic soul that is Laura Dern I'm just be listening to you as I see like the beauty of performing right like you're practicing and practicing and you're back there and you're looking it over you're mentally going through it in your mind and then you have to go out there and you have to do it and and the awesome thing is like with your heart beating out of your chest with your you know like I can't say then instead of man or whatever it is you know it the performance is the thing right because that's what we do we perform we're like we go out there on the stage whether it's in a set or in front of 50,000 people or whatever it is and we got to perform you got to do it and and that's like the professional part right like you go out there and even though like in your mind in the back of your mind you're like oh I might mess up on the first take okay I have another take it doesn't mean you go out there you do it that's...
so that's so dope I'm curious if you've ever had an experience where the actor you had to work across from wasn't giving you what you needed or it just wasn't really vibing the way it needed to you know if you you know work with an actor and it just wasn't working with not working meaning chemistry like you don't connect yeah then you really need to you know when you go to and there are people who have that rhythm where they're listening to you and then they wait a long time before they respond and if you're a person and I think we all share this where we're like almost finishing everybody sentences because we're having so much fun talking it's super weird when somebody goes I know what you mean how has it taken six minutes to respond to the quad so if you're with an actor who's maybe rhythm is so different different it could feel odd or if they're just amazing I mean I think yeah it's interesting for me I I was trained in the theater and so that's where I feel like most at home and film is something that I've been working on for the last what six years and what's interesting about film is that you are at risk I think more often of having an actor that doesn't respond because on stage it is the performers who are in charge of the magic whereas on film there's other people in charge of the magic you know yes the performance do their thing but then there's the editor who ultimately is the...
one that puts the performance together then it's the take you know you just have to do this and the camera you know all these weird things where you can't look at the person you're acting with you have to look at the X or something like that so all those things get in the way or make just human exchange a little bit more challenging and therefore I think it's you are more likely to find moments with an actor where things are not gelling because there's so many other things to deal with so I think for me my my growth in acting for the for film is almost 2 you have to be a lot more self reliant it's one of what I'm I'm realizing that you have to you have to be able to control your performance in a way that it doesn't necessarily have to rely on the other person but for example with us I played both the hero and the villain so I never had my feet singing partner there you know I was playing against green dots and stuff like that and I had to really I have to act and then I had to prepare for how I reacted so that was one of the ways that I had to be extremely technical and self-reliant and to trust that the editor would do his job to make it make the talking and listening happen so for me that the working on this on us was a lesson in how effective being self-reliant can be it's almost like you have to you have to you have to control what you can and then just let go and and trust that your scene partner the editor will will do the gluing...
and it sounds like a lot of preparation yes a lot of prepare yeah then you know what it is that you're trying to achieve on the day and depending on the circumstances whatever shows up you have your arsenal sort of to fall back on look at what are you gonna pull from when what's necessary exactly and you know in the moment what's necessary because you know what the goal is and you've already sort of I don't know looked at the at the trajectory right so you understand where all the places it might go and you just figure out for yourself as you go along how it's you know what's necessary yeah I wonder enough like I am that person people are like yeah there just wasn't a connection there I don't know what's going on no I'm just like a retracement out of it I think for me like if you come onto set and like if the other actor is like having a bad day or I feel like I i sometimes that energy will come off a little bit you know and it's not anyone's fault and I think it's always like if you if you hate me then like I'm gonna feel uncomfortable right now you know but then I think that when you do have those talks with your co-stars or whatever and you kind of realize that they're human as well and they're going they have the same fears I think that helps like the the onset can I just just knowing the empathy and knowing that we're all we're both you're going through it you know I'm curious how...
important it is for all of you to sort of shift what people expect from you based on your choices Aquafina I know with the farewell you did a really dramatic role when you were kind of known for for comedy before did that add extra pressure where you worried people would expect you to be funny in the movie yeah I mean added a lot of pressure yeah I am I was really really scared yeah because um I think you know you know what people think about you and stuff like that but you don't know you don't know what you can do you know and I think that you create all these different scenarios in your head about the worst it can go on the best it can go and you want to strive for this kind of invisible best that never will come true but I think it's it's it's you know that's driving that that you kind of run on it's so different now the climate is so different now there's so many wonderful opportunities for women of every age to you know play all different types of people and you know I I feel when I was working in my early 20s and even like my late teens early 20s you know it I felt that I sort of got somehow typecast as I was like very kind of hyper sexualized which was I guess you know at the time seemed okay to everyone it was another time even though it wasn't part of my own narrative it was kind of crafted forming by probably a bunch of dudes in the industry and you know I guess that worked then but it was really difficult for me to try to figure...
out how to get out of being a non janu or the other woman because it was never anything that I had intended and I'd been working since I was eight years old and certainly that was never like a goal of mine I sort of had to kind of shake it up a little bit because I just couldn't seem to I just didn't want to work on stuff that I like knew how to do and knew I could do it and it was it was like what is this like the judge I remember thinking at the time like maybe I need a different job in this industry that would sort of be more fulfilling because there seemed like there was just no where to go and so I actually had a had a the opportunity to do a play to do an Arthur Miller play on Broadway and it actually it totally reset my whole way of thinking about how I could work and what the different kind of opportunities that could be available to me and it's amazing how theater is limitless you know and it just felt so even though it was terrifying it felt it was liberating because I actually felt that every night I had the opportunity to change the narrative and and and I had as

Lupita

had said earlier you know you have control of your own kind of fate on stage and just in to some degree and you're in charge of your own of your own destiny up there Rene I know you took about a six-year break from acting was that a choice to also sort of reset things or have you had to do that at other points not in terms of if you talk about people's perceptions of a...
brand or anything like that I I was listening to what you were saying and I thought it was really interesting because it reminded me as a young person starting out that I would get those jobs you know I'll get the cutoff shorts and you know the other woman of the you know a one-night-stand girl and I did about three or four of those little jobs in Texas while still University and I thought you know I think um I think I'm going to not do this anymore because I I know where that road will go I don't know what it's gonna look like ultimately but I bet it would be really hard to get off that road and there's the inevitability of things changing and your body changes and you know you grow older and you know you have a life and you look like your life and thank God for that right and I thought I want to be good with the inevitability I want to be good with that and I want to work in a way where I can I can portray women who are relatable throughout my life I don't want to have to stop at a particular time because it can't where the cut off anymore because it looks weird you know it's a bad idea it doesn't really relate to the person that you grow into or your time but it's funny cuz you know don't you don't you feel like a different person you know he's just yeah you know sending out that was interesting listening to what you were saying about that because I am I wondered what that experience might might have been like and it...
wasn't even by your choosing it's because it's just the nature of having borne a very beautiful woman you know so I think that's um I think it's interesting no but and good for you because what so was I thought it's so interesting I've loved watching your career from the beginning watching you grow up and you know through your roles and as it from a very young woman you've been working and to see that no matter what you said that you had been hyper-sexualized I always felt that your your talents who preceded that I felt that always I mean it may have been your experience from the inside or whatever it was that you're being asked to do in terms of promotion or whatever it was but I always saw a wonderful actress always I mean I'm sure you guys are you oh yeah I know my ways and I saw you in that play and you are phenomenal hmm so so so gifted I think yeah oh yes yes I'll do this again so I'm curious about your views on sort of the press and fan attention and that public facing part of your experience as an actress how do you deal with when things are unkind whether on social media or in the press and what is has your view of that changed over time I mean I just III not to put anybody in an awkward position but to say I know we've all faced it and the difficulty of trying to keep one's life private but I must say you carry this other extraordinary gift of being iconic and this larger story and I knowing what it has felt...
like for me there are moments when I'll pass a magazine cover and just feel you know grief for anybody having to walk through this like the salacious you know again narrative that's created and every downfall had it yeah yeah but I mean I I turn it with curiosity to you because it is amazing to be you know considered this you know iconic music legend and also truly be considered an act first of all like as two tiny separate gifts but but it's beautiful and while everybody gets to create their stories yeah it's it about that part of it it's it's funny from the beginning I've been kind of really picked out and plagued with that lots of stories lots of Lies lots of things where you're trying to figure out like how did this happen how did I become that person and I think what I've learned is that none of it matters mm-hmm and I don't it doesn't really bother me anymore I've learned that like I Know Who I am I know what I do I know I'm a good person I know I'm just out here working my ass off and you know trying to you know fulfill myself creatively in a way you know because that's a drive of mine that's my thing you know and I I don't I just learned not to worry about anything else anything else me my kids my life my my work what I'm gonna do next what creative fun thing I can do what can we produce what can we what's the show gonna be what's than this you know what I mean it's like that is the...
the makeup of my life and what what you realize is you know because there was a time in my life where was such a big part and it was so hurtful and it was so hard that you think you know I don't want to do this anymore I don't want to be this I don't want to be the person on the cover of the magazine every week for two and a half years I don't this is crazy why me you know and then you go well it only just hurt you and even most of it wasn't true so why do you care like I had to get to a point where I just was like it just doesn't matter it doesn't matter what people say what matters is who you are who you are and what you're doing and I think eventually that got through no matter what people are writing on what they're saying that you they just all of a sudden see you they go oh wait she's been around a long time and she's doing okay and she seems pretty nice and you know and I think honestly American Idol helped with that a lot of all the things that I've done in my career people like actually just seeing me talk about how much I love music and how much I love people and how much of a girl's girl I am how much of a crier I am and you know all the things and things shifted you know and but it's it I just I just realized it just does the biggest thing is just it does it it's not really the thing that matters I think they can write whatever they want tomorrow and it wouldn't matter Renee I want to talk about...
playing Judy because obviously part of her story was sort of the way she was treated by the public and the media at a certain point in her career how did you sort of get into the headspace of relating to her at that point of her in her life well I guess going back to what

Jennifer

said you know where is that story come from you know and you again you get to that place where you resign yourself to needing to be the determinant of your own I guess I don't know legacy whatever that might be how your children or your niece and nephew think of you going forward you know from based on what it is that they might read but knowing that there's so much more to a story than what's written and understanding and looking at what was written about her at the time of her passing and the years leading up to it in the last chapter of her life it seemed so unfair to me because it was a coarse salacious because that's what's so exciting to read about and that news travels more quickly doesn't it when they say well I travel around the world while the truth is still putting its shoes on mm-hmm and I thought I'd like to understand this better I'd like to understand why that chapter is blanketed in tragedy and why she's was accused of things making such bad choices and how she ended up in a place where she was facing so many challenges was there a certain point in the process where you felt like I really I have it like when you put on the hair and the outfit and...
the makeup or was it much earlier than that where you like I've really got Hoshi a no that didn't happen didn't happen it was it was in motion it was a process that was in constant motion just little experiments we were trying things every day and it didn't feel like making a film it felt like the celebration of her because everybody came to set and was motivated by the same affection or adoration for her and it was an expression of that so we were all cooperatively trying things and there was always knew someone would find a recording or we read something in a book and we were always sharing and sort of adjusting according to what came along making choices on the day and just sort of conjuring her essence as as truthfully as we could based on you know those those things that treasure we were mining for every day was there like a time like a couple weeks in or a few weeks in Marie's something like felt in the pocket of it and you felt like you could be playful and you know kind of make decisions or act on your instinct because you were Judy then because there was it kind of settled you know how the parameters were say yeah you know at times you it just kind of you like draw I feel sometimes when you're starting out it's and you know it's abstract you know you're trying to find it with everybody or there's pieces a fragment that's right and all the people around you whoever it is whether it's the camera department trying to...
figure out how this look is in what you know what's your you know what is this finding that how to capture this performance and then your hair and makeup team and all that stuff and then I feel like sometimes a few weeks in you're like oh I I can walk on the set as this person and I have this playground and I can do all this stuff did you find that or was it always did you cut did you always have this you know the thing that you're describing were you kind of where it felt like you just had to try out all these different things it was never it was never disconnected you know we were building on something trying to I mean it sounds so crazy but it felt our essence was palpable on the set because her music was always playing and we were always exclusive recordings of her voice music when I played Selena one of the things that got me the most kind of in her body was performing because you look at her you're gonna try to imitate her a little bit and then let that go and just live right but the music and the actual performance because that's what we have that is the real things where you can really like a watcher but you didn't get to talk to her in person which is the hard part right is the the music kind of guy you like I got you know what I mean like the music was such a big part of it I wonder if that was the same for you oh yeah absolutely well because there's a performance language there that's developed over so many years my body language...
yeah and when that's when that becomes familiar mm-hm and then it becomes a habit and then you don't think about it anymore and you can kind of wear whatever it is that's that's populate with you - yes those movements are like how she moves yeah you know it's all the sudden you're like going okay well this is this was where she was comfortable in her body and this is this is how she moved her hands not just on stage but when she was talking you know what I mean it's like it's a whole thing yeah and you just yeah just build you just built on that and did you like playing somebody like a real person oh yeah I love playing I feel like it's just to be out of blueprint yeah yeah it's nice to have a point of revenue no several points of reference but the the responsibility is different - oh yeah yeah yeah right right yeah cuz you wanna well they love her yeah you want a love Judy so much and you do - no they do Selena and Joe had just died two years before so they were like you better like luckily I was young and more ignorant like now if I had to do it I would be so in my head so much more in my head it would be much more difficult I think and I hope I own that movie and watch it all of it I was like you keep moving in like in the it's right when you play one of those type of characters it's like you're constantly talking about who she was and what she did and how she did it and it's it's a it's it's it forms as...
it goes it forms as it goes it's one thing to get it right and I was sharing with you before he walked in here it's another thing when I get so excited that people who've seen the film and your performance will say to me have you seen anything she gave her back and a few people have just literally started crying talking about what a gift it was to feel like they had Judy I just was so touched by that aquafina The Farewell is based on Lulu Wong's true story with her grandmother how did that help inform the character for you the cool thing about Lulu and Billie is that Lulu wasn't like very precious about keeping her exact 'add and she would say things like she wouldn't say like that's not how I sneeze it was it wasn't like that and I think she was always very receptive to like any input I had about what what she would be doing what you'd be thinking and I think it's it's that trust that I think also really helps a performance also you know you don't want to if when you're working with the director and you improv something they're like can we not do that it's like you just like the worst feeling ever but then you know it wouldn't you have that trust like it's it's nice but yeah I think and as a result you reinvent something else and I think in the case of the farewell Billie really became like this vessel for the Asian American experience or the - American experience that is lost between two worlds...
and and you know doesn't know what to do yeah Laura you worked with both Greta Gerwig and Noah Baumbach this year and they're obviously a real-life couple what did you find sort of similar about the way they work and what was sort of the starkest difference well I think they're both a scarlet described with Noah they're both exacting about the words because they really I think as a playwright would they really hear a rhythm to the language with Noah it it has its own specific nature and one thing that I was so inspired by and I think we found in rehearsals even when we aren't in the scenes with the people at hand when it's with Adam with his attorney or

Scarlett

and I together he feels there is a real musicality to the film I think he hears a rhythm Noah that he's waiting for everyone to resonate with in a really beautiful way and so having rehearsal time and many dinners over in the case of

Scarlett

myself an Adam over a year year and a half as he was writing the script you started to see him build for each character a similar melody in the case of Greta she was also adapting Little Women we wanted to honor Louisa May Alcott's words and another time seemingly but she's so brilliantly trusting of of how modern the story is of how modern Louis's writing is and how clear a revolutionary Louisa was and and through these characters complicated and beautiful different female characters that she wrote but also that she heard the language in a...
way that I think is very similar to how she and Noah have worked and collaborated both as co-writers and her as his actress but there is a rhythm to the language that she brings that is seemingly messy and joyful and complicated and angry and all of those things but it's very strategic are you seeing concrete changes as you work in this business do you really feel a difference on sets or in the sort of culture of Hollywood well Greta and Loreen are great examples of an exciting year of women having some autonomy hmm I hear the conversations and I've been you know in partnerships with men professional partnerships with men who make different choices now even if it's just to be clear yeah even if it's just to be clear about your intentions are yeah keep the door open or I don't mean I had one gentleman say I don't meet with women alone I just always make sure that there's somebody else in here because I don't want anything to be misconstrued or misunderstood and I want her to be comfortable so so you see that there are different choices being made and like you said maybe it's just being more care consideration now that don't go that's a nice yeah I think we've stood up and said hey we don't want this to be going on it's been going on a long time and it's enough and on a more positive note we have movies like hustlers and like Little Women and all these other movies where the women at the forefront and they're...
produced we're producing we're directing we're writing it were editing it we're doing our movie was all all women all women but it was great and it was awesome and you realize like what a after doing so many movies with so many years help where that is like when you have it like that and you're like wow I've never had this experience what he some movies or whatever the hell that's that's always very interesting to me when I hear that because when I first started my the first direct direct the first two directors I worked with women and I'd say there was an equal amount and when I hear about you know an industry that existed that really that was really rare it's it's a very mind-blowing for me I can't imagine not working with a woman at the helm of a project

Lupita

you've worked with Jordan Peele Steve McQueen Mira Nair I think a lot of filmmakers who have been underrepresented in the past in Hollywood are you making these choices specifically to work with you know directors like that or is it just the roles you've you've been drawn to I think these are all directors who have offered me the most interesting roles mm-hmm and I've taken them and yeah there was there's I I don't I haven't really thought I don't yeah I haven't really thought about the demographic of the director I've been working with I think because I am I mean I am a black woman and so you know this industry is is this time...
this me to time this times up time is about allowing for more equitable representation and I'm a beneficiary of that movement because in the in the work that I'm being I've been able to do and like Aquafina I can't for me I'm very grateful to have come into the industry at the time that I have because I am I am benefiting from the efforts of a lot of other women who have come before me other black women who have come before me who have had it a lot rougher than I have and I'm aware of that it's a time when directors like Steve McQueen and Jordan Peele are being given chances to make work and so they are able to then you know in Jordan's case write with someone like me in mind for their their next film you know so I think it's a you know it's not necessarily my conscious effort it's it's you know the this is evidence of the transformation happening and for me I think there it's this is a time where there is a concerted effort to consider diversity and inclusion what I really want is for it to not be a fad yeah a trend you know what revision right now it's really dope and cool and on trend to work with women and underrepresented groups but I think the the moment of maturity in the industry is when it is just the norm yeah sure when when you no longer need to ask that question I think when I first started one of the things that I wanted to do because that was Puerto Rican Latino was that I wanted to be in romantic comedies...
because I felt like all the women in romantic comedies were always looked the same way they were always just you know they were always white and I was like there's never anybody if I can do it and just show them I'm every girl mm-hmm cuz I'm I have i am the hopeless romantic i I am the single working woman I am I am all I was those things and that's one of the things that you asked earlier like do you did you make certain choices and I remember thinking like I need to be the lead in a romantic comedy I need to do that I have to do that and that's one of the things I went for and that's one of the things me and my agents talked about like can we find me a romantic comedy you know yes I've done you know Selena and me Familia and people are taking notice but what can what can we do or I can change that do that be that you know yeah I think there's a genuine urge for audiences to want an industry that represents their life yeah and I think that in that way that's why I'm very positive about the direction that we're going in I don't think that having people of different cultures or women will be a trend because I think that it's what people want people you know we're changing a society I don't think that the work that times up or the media movement will you will reverse I think that it's going to become engraved into how we work and how a set is run you know I think that those changes are only positive because...
we're moving forward as a society you know a couple of filmmakers have come out sort of against Marvel films Carla and

Lupita

I'm especially curious what you think about Marvel films being called the theme parks of movies and things like that I think there's a there's certainly a place for you know all kinds of cinema right now I mean people people absorb content in so many different ways you know I actually didn't totally understand that statement because I guess I I needed some insight as to what it meant exactly and somebody had pointed out to me because to me it seemed kind of like a little old-fashioned but um somebody pointed out to me that perhaps what the statement meant was that the there's no room for smaller films because the felt the cinema is taken up by these like enormous blockbusters and that like smaller movies don't have a chance in at the theater which I hadn't actually considered which i think is a valid point but I also feel like you know I feel like there's sort of this shift in how people watch stuff and there's all these platforms for different kinds yeah and now there's movie and shows and art films and all kinds of stuff getting me that you can watch in all these different ways and I just feel like it's just it's just changing its it doesn't mean it's going away I mean some of us of course it's hard when you love the idea of going to the movies and making what needs to be projected on...
this big screen and it's such a shame you watch it on this tiny thing but it's like that's how people watch movies right and you kind of have to go with the flow of like the intent if I can add to your point it seems like it's a chicken-and-egg conversation because of what you're talking about in terms of content and how we've changed how we sort of take in different you know the cinematic experiences or what used to be cinematic experiences the place of movies the place and the importance of cinema has also shifted a little bit you know we used to all watch the same things because the movie came to the theaters and it was in the theaters for a couple months and that we went several times and then everybody was talking about it we all had the same heroes and so it set up a particular business model and that was the paradigm for so many decades it's kind of weird when suddenly the only things that sort of fit the modern financial paradigm are these bigger films in terms of you know people who were eager to invest to go and make a film that's a that's a proven tried and true in the current atmosphere where people don't run to the cinema two and three times to see a movie as readily as they did and say the last millennium like so expensive to go to the moon yeah I mean it's crazy like I can't every time I go I can't believe that like City why not can afford it's crazy and I think that's part of the problem also is...
it's like if you want to go see something in the theatre I'm just kind of looking at it from somebody else's perspective maybe you just want to see something that's like big and explosive and you could take your whole family to and it's fun and your popcorn and all those it's like a huge experience and then maybe the stuff that's more intimate or like you want to kind of kind of pick and choose from you think oh I'll watch this on you know watch this from home or watch it in some other way yeah and I think it's just the reality of also how on how its how it it's just so unaffordable movies it's it's crazy to me um I guess that's also part of the business model that you're talking about and I think this will be my last question about sort of making movies in 2019 do you feel the culture around nudity and sex scenes has change in the way it's discussed now and the choices you would make yourselves as

actresses

I think it's a personal choice I've always felt like that's a personal choice for anybody I don't judge anybody for doing it for not doing it you know you take a role you decide what you're gonna do you discuss it with your director you see if it serves the story and the character in the best way and then you have a choice to say yes or no you spoke about how early on in your career you were asked to like take I don't mom too and you did it I don't want to oh you're talking about...
personal yeah no the director out of fitting asked me to take my time off not for the movie to see what I was supposed to do nudity in the movie they wanted to see her breath he onesie my boobs and I was like what they look like before yes that is crazy well he was crazy and and God who know I said no I stood up for myself but it was so funny because I remember like being so panicked in the moment like oh my god and by the way there was a costume designer in the movie with me and so was a woman another woman in the room with me and he says this and I was like no you know luckily that lova the Bronx came out you know what I mean and I was like I have to show you much no on the same you were like that though because not everybody would feel because you given in that moment and all of a sudden that cursors off and running right thinking they could do whatever they want and because I put up a little boundary right there and said no he he'd laid off and then later on apologized but the minute he walked out of the room the costume town was like I'm so sorry I'm so sorry that just happened and I was like you know throne for a second or whatever but that was a I feel like that could still happen I don't know yeah I don't think we're like far away from that you know I've I was talking to some of our crew from the last film and I did about just inappropriate behavior in general and they were talking about a particular DP that was just like doing all kinds of...
crazy stuff with the actor and like shooting up the skirts and then you know our first savings like ad had to go over to the actress and say hey just you know like maybe you want to check and see because I think the camera angles like gonna maybe not be something that you're comfortable with and she had no idea and this was like you know whatever they just finished shooting a year and a half ago or something and yeah the person I was talking he was just baffled by he you know he was saying I can't believe this goes on but it it totally still goes on yeah I mean the difference now though is that because of the conversations that are happening in public women like for me I feel now my my it's easier to a little more Howard yes it's easier to tell when something is inappropriate yeah because in that moment if the costume designer had said something you know it could have changed if she had supported you in some way spoken up it would have changed you know what I mean the dynamic and so now I feel we're programming a younger the younger generation to know what's okay and what's not yeah that it's not okay to be in a costume fitting and for a man to ask that of you yeah and and not at least in even though those things might happen our defenses would be sharper you know yeah yeah I was thinking - your point - I'll answer yours with a younger generation I don't know that it wouldn't occur to them to speak up where we thought oh wow this is...
well yeah what do I do here what do I do here let me navigate this yes totally Wayne trapped you fellas a try yeah let me grab laughs and I had a great acting teacher who told me all of the things that would happen you know not not that he told me things about like oh they're gonna have to see your boobs but he was like on the set you kiss you don't kiss all the way you know when you're rehearsing and you have respect for your actors and redirect it so I had like a blue a kind of an idea in my mind that this is not a good you know I'm not supposed to get make it before and I took you off at the last minute like I know this stuff and so again it's like teaching passing it down and what's happened now is a big lesson for all women right it's like no this is these things are okay these things are not okay and it doesn't matter what context is in it so then you get to have never okay to feel uncomfortable right and as you said the light is on now yes and in what feels comfortable and how to set boundaries but also in calling someone out I mean I ya know for these guys I started auditioning at ten eleven years old and I listen now to the next generation saying I mean it's crazy you're here they storm worse than you do what people used to have auditions and hotel rooms I'm like every single time waiting in the lobby of a hotel they're like the director is waiting for you in the room now - yeah and there was no oh yes yeah with a lot...
of lady casting directors - by the way right yeah that was kind of convenient if they were looking out of town or whatever I'm deuce houses or oh yeah there's that too you can put everybody in that if you were that person right but also now there's intimacy coaches I've also not been asked to do much nudity in my career but and and and sex scenes but there's I've heard that now they have intimacy coaches on set which i think is really great you know when you have a fight scene you have a fight coordinator why not have an intimacy coordinators we had a comfort coach what was it called it was it was basically somebody who understood that world and said you know these things are okay and these things are not okay and made everybody on the set comfortable with what they were doing you know because we had a lot of women who were half dressed or naked topic you know what I mean so but this is still a professional environment and nobody should be made to feel and those things are very very helpful I think yeah thing us above board does that intimacy coach work for just normal people we run out of time I think we should end but Matt no thank you so much for joining thank you hi I'm

Jennifer

Lopez

I'm the Piton young mom hi I'm Aquafina I am

Scarlett

Johansson

thank you for watching thanks for watching The Hollywood Reporter's The Hollywood Reporter round tables on YouTube on YouTube bye