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A-to-Z GRAFTING TUTORIAL on ‘Approach Grafting’ | Before & Afters | Prunus & Apple &

May 31, 2021
Hi, I'm Charles Malik, implant biologists at the organic ivory portal, we grow charcoal plants and today we're going to talk about

grafting

. This is one of my favorite

grafting

methods that we are going to discuss. Now we are in the middle

approach

ing the end of May and most of the grafting techniques most of the grafting of fruit trees the opportunity has passed we are going to talk about the best time for grafting but with this technique we are going to do today You're going to be able to plot quite a bit almost any time of year, especially during its growing season, which is contrary to most other grafting methods, but before we begin, I first want to let everyone watching this video know. the fact that we are going to have our first YouTube live stream on YouTube video on Saturday, June 16 at 8:05 PST or here from Los Angeles, California where we will be launching our first introductory line of multipurpose organic fertilizers that will hit the market that day will again be June 16 at 8:05 a.m. m. and for the first 20 of you to join and follow a few simple steps, you'll have a chance to win a free bag of Ivy Organics all-purpose organic fertilizer.
a to z grafting tutorial on approach grafting before afters prunus apple
That's unlike anything on the market today across the country, so you'll have a chance to get your hands on these things. We will talk about Ivory organic fertilizers and review all ivory organic products. product line so you can familiarize yourself with all the products that we now have available to you and again, since we are live, I will be able to answer questions instantly and interact with you over and over again for the first time. on the YouTube story of the ivory organics YouTube channel, I'm going to be able to have a one-on-one dialogue and answer questions and help explain things right away and I'm going to try to be available throughout that hour and again starting at 8: 05 and don't be late, I think ivory crowned it all, let's get started, so now this is our number one key tip, when is the best time to graft and most gardeners and most if you go to a nursery or the most. everywhere you go, they will tell you that the best time to graft will be in late winter, before the plants wake up, before the SAPS and the trees start to flow, and you have basically nailed those grafting techniques that you know while the plant is still considered dormant even in evergreen plants such as citrus, I would normally bring them back home towards the end of winter and wait for that growth spurt as most plants push the most growth in early spring;
a to z grafting tutorial on approach grafting before afters prunus apple

More Interesting Facts About,

a to z grafting tutorial on approach grafting before afters prunus apple...

That being said, that is the general principle, however, when it comes to avocados we are now being more specific. Avocados are generally grafted in spring. There are even grafting techniques that are done even in summer and even in late fall. Citrus fruits are the same. way they have other seasons in which they can also be grafted throughout the year but again it depends It depends on the grafting techniques used and again on the time of the season, but as we just said before, the general principle and with most of the plants, the ideal time to graft will be at the end of winter, which is a very limited period. window between the passage of the possibility of frost in your community until the beginning of spring and is not necessarily defined as the first day of spring on March 21 or 22, but spring is the awakening of the plan to be your past , the chance of frost and the temperature in your growing zone and it could be as late as April and even May, depending on how far north you are in the United States where it may be colder, it will take longer for your plant to wake up from the lethargy and begin to grow.
a to z grafting tutorial on approach grafting before afters prunus apple
It's early spring growth, so the window is very narrow, but I've been grafting pretty much year-round throughout my entire garden using a method known as the

approach

grafting method, which for me is my favorite practice. and my favorite grafting technique where you basically grow two trees together, both on the same roof and once the union between the two has healed, you basically separate the grafted pot from the actual tree you are trying to graft on. . I'll be explaining. This is for you to do the demonstration in just a second, but I want to share with you that the best time to start the grafting method is from spring to summer and even early fall.
a to z grafting tutorial on approach grafting before afters prunus apple
The goal is for the process to take an average of six to eight weeks. no more than ten weeks to achieve a successful union between the two plants and then from there I would separate the UM from the two plants so that the graft can now depend on your new cane that intended to want what we are going to do. What we do here today is and we have this plum tree that we started the introduction with about a month ago and we can quickly recap and see what it was like when it was a tree of this height and you can see.
Over here we started with a Santa Rosa plum and I may have cut it a little past the graft union. I'm going to share a clearer graphic, but it looks like the graft union is here if you want to jump in. a little closer you can see the difference in the wood between what was the rootstock and then the grafted area and you can see that there is something like a helper or a teepee right there once I have pruned the top of the tree out of the way. creative is a bunch of shoots that are basically off the root how do I prune it a little above the graph?
I would have finished something with some wood and some branches that are from this variety of tree that originally started with the Santa Rosa plum, but what we are going to do today is turn this Santa Rosa plum rootstock into three more fruit varieties What we are going to graft on these saplings starting This tree here is the Babcock peach, secondly the royal apricot and, finally, the burgundy plum and by grafting these three varieties, what we are going to end up with are three flavors of fruits, all within the

prunus

family that we are going to discuss. which in just a second and to make it clearer it's called the genus Prunus and not the family, we'll talk about classification in just a minute, but basically we have all of these related trees, but notice how different the peach and nectarine leaves are as well. they have a similar elongated leaf shape compared to the apricot which has a more rounded leaf shape and then take a look at the plum which is kind of in between so key tip number two is there are a variety of techniques of graft that can be used.
I just shared with you. My personal favorite is the approach grafting technique, but there is also a grafting technique known as cleft grafting, another known as lateral veneer grafts, and another known as whip and tongue grafting. about at least a dozen different grafting techniques that can be used again, my favorite is approach grafting, it can be done as I just said in spring, summer and early fall as long as there is activity and growth within the plant and the goal is again. the two plants will live and grow on the same path, while the graft union has allowed the opportunity to heal and again, the average time for any graph, then all techniques are on average between 6 and 8 weeks, no more. 10 weeks and you should see some growth and some life coming out of it, another thing to keep in mind is that once you have grafted these Tinian into the unions and in just 7 to 10 days, many of the vascular tissues, the xylem and the phloem which is basically like the underlying and existing straws within the cambium layers and the cambium layers again are that green layer of tissue that is underneath the rod which is the most active living zone of fluid tissue within The entire structure of the plant is that layer of cambium again that underlies the bar and we are going to demonstrate that right now all these trees that I bring with me to my left and that we are going to graft today are also grafted trees.
We will use these trees to basically achieve what it will be today, a three and one cocktail fruit tree and once they grow and reach about two or three feet of growth, once there is a branch arm that branches, we'll graph that quarter and then hopefully take it from three to six and from six. to nine and from nine to twelve and even more, the goal is to eventually have between ten and twenty fruit flavors, all under one roof and we will do it together and at the end of this video I will also share it with you are my fig tree now six and one that is also making its way there as far as varieties go and we are going to be able to enjoy the fruit this year and there are already some small fruits that I can also share with you so stay tuned before we begin let me share with you these unions of grafting between the peach, the apricot and the plum, so if you come this way, you can take a look at the plum first and see that the rootstock is here, basically. cut off the top of the rootstock to basically encourage all the energy of the rootstock to come into this burgundy plum graph.
It is safe to assume that the grower used virtually the same rootstock as it is successful and refers to offering disease resistance, it also controls the height of the plant that the grower wants to achieve and a lot of varieties, so this is the rootstock, here's the rootstock again and here again is the graft, you can see there's some exposed wood that we're going to protect and cover right now with the organic ivory products, we'll discuss that in a minute, but here's the root and then that's the callous tissue right on top, who is that with the apricot flavor on top and third? and lastly here is the next rootstock and this is where they pruned the rootstock to encourage growth to go into the Scion wood which is the selected peach flavor that they grafted on top of it and again here we have some wood exposed and Take a look at all these shoot growths here.
This is not the same variety of peach, but it seems to have another peach flavor or I can tell by the shape of this leaf that it is a peach or nectarine family. but it is important to remove these suckers to ensure that all the growth goes towards the graft, as the root pattern is not favored over the graft, which the tree will naturally tend to do that, so we are going to continue with our prunes and we try to remove that much cleaner in just a second, so we're going to get a nice clean, close cut like that, so now the next thing we're going to do is take the organic ivory product and the organic ivory product.
This is the three-in-one plant protector against harmful sunburned insects and rodents to use on your roses, fruit and nut trees, ornamental trees and shrubs, an organic and environmentally safe and non-toxic product, and we will use it to protect new plant and tree shields installed pruned and damaged surfaces in this situation we are going to seal this exposed wood, which can be considered a pruning or its graft union and this one here basically comes with a powder and an oil. You can see I only have a little bit of the product left here. The three-in-one protection is because it has all these oils that serve as repellents.
Castor oil. Cinnamon. Teeth. Garlic. Mint. Rosemary. And Peppermint. What we're going to do here is just apply it with a brush and again it starts as a powder and oil. Add water to the contents and what we will do is simply apply it with a brush to protect the graft. Union against diseases and passes and even with that pruning that we did to the suckers below we can seal all that too and when it comes to protecting your plants and this is a method known in the horticultural world as blanching and here we are doing it in color brown, also available in green and white colors, but this is basically to protect your plants again against diseases and pests, as well as protecting your plants from the extremes of both summer and winter, in the winter it offers insulation to the plants. from sunburn also known as sunburn and in the summer naturally the sun summer sunburn so this year it will basically help the plant focus more on growth and healing and grow instead of focus on the damage and repair of cellular tissue caused by exposure of this trunk. to too much light until this canopy finally develops, so we just talked about the three-in-one ivory organic plant protector, which is the gold label product.
There is also the blue label, which is the whitewashed formula. If you take a look here, the whitewashed formula is protection against harmful summer sunburn winter sunburn, but this product here is an oil-free version, so if you are not looking for protection against pests like insects and rodents, then you will go for the oil-free version. oil and lastly there is also a ready to use spray, the ivory gonic 3:1 plant protector, ready to use spray again, the same protection against harmful sunburned insects and rodents, sonow this is our key tip number three, we are going to talk about what type of plants you can graft. with each other and one of the first things I did when I was introduced to grafting in seventh grade and this was again what drew me to the world of plants and my passion and interest in horticulture is grafting, if you didn't already know. that's from watching the previous videos but anyway when it comes to grafting the first thing I tried was a graft was a rose on top of a cactus assuming that that would work and I had not understood the relationship between the plants and that when it comes to graphing they have to be you know combine similar things and a cactus and a rose are very far away, see how that works, however the things that can be grafted together are things within the citrus family and again I use the word family just because I'm thinking about the relationship, but the key word is gender, it's within the same gender and we're going to talk about classification in a second.
The same applies to avocados: you wouldn't graft an avocado onto an

apple

, nor an

apple

onto a fig, nor a fig onto one of these

prunus

belongs to the genus Prunus, which is careful not to say family at the time, so The goal is to match the similar, as long as they are related and not always, but normally, within the same genus, those that are excessively graft to each other. Another thing I want to share with you as a lesson is not to graft the same and some Of you ask why would I do that, but I have seen people try this not to plot a Eureka lemon tree on another Eureka lemon tree or a Hass avocado has a stem that is the selected flavor on another Hass avocado, some people will try to do that being one or they will try to rejuvenate and restart a plant and basically take down the entire tree and then graft onto itself genetically identical tissue which rarely works, it may work but it won't be as strong as Mary since I used the word marry but graft i.e. , joining similar types of tissues, plants that are normally again within the same genus. will work better and now let's talk about some of these trees that you brought with me and this is just a small sample of the genus Prunus and within the prunus family which includes peaches, apricots and plums, as well as almonds, cherries and nectarines . and there may be even more, there are up to 400 fruit trees within the classification of prunus, the genus Prunus and then the species will be specific to the peach and then it will be us and then there will be a subspecies or a variety that will be within that species of plants that then it will give the difference between all the related peaches which are the yellow stone peach, the white stone yellow peach and all the varieties that exist within the peaches, which are also unlimited, so now we understand a little bit about that , let me also talk briefly about the classification within the classification and I'm going to put the first letter of the general category that is and I'm going to read this from my sheet here is K p c or FG s and the way to remember that is to keep the pots clean. or the family gets sick the case of the kingdom and the kingdom is the plant kingdom all the plants all its trees, including algae, algae are in the plant family and basically at the highest level of the kingdom, basically there are all the differences between conifers and palm trees, by analogy. like we just said and all the differences in between as you go down from the realm to the p4 phylum for class and oh for order and asking for family, eventually you get to G for genus and the smallest classification before you go in in the details it's s for species so now we made that mnemonic to help you with classification and the goal is to get as close to this genus as possible.
The other thing I want to share with you very quickly in this category of relationship is prunus, they are all in the prunus family that we just talked about there can be up to 400 species. I want to make sure I haven't missed anything in my notes. the genus of apples is Mallis, so again all varieties of apples we have a three in one apple. tree here in the garden, they have all been grafted on a Mallis rootstock, an apple variety rootstock, another is avocados, avocados from the genus / SIA when it comes to fig trees that belong to the genus ficus and within the family of the ficus, I thought this was interesting there's the ficus benjamina, which is the common domestic ficus plant that you've seen and that ficus plant doesn't look anything like, at least in my opinion, a fig tree, so you know it's producing fruits, but within the same genus there is that ficus benjamina there is also this ficus carica which is the largest of the edible fig varieties and then there is also the ficus pumila ficus Pamela is the variety of creeping fig and in fact I have seen someone in social networks successfully graft an edible fig onto harvester figs, so what would otherwise grow like the creeping fig as a hedge or on a wall or a fence the creeping fig even though they look nothing alike and grow completely different, the creeping fig is more of a vine while the edible fig grows into a tree.
Can you tell which ones grow so tall depending on the variety? Thirty-forty feet. This guy was able to successfully plot the two again because they are both within the same genus and their vascular tissues are aligned and Akane was successful at it, so we just talked. about all those differences between plants and I hope it helps you with some ideas on how you might like to plot some plant varieties within your own garden. Well, let's finally get started, so here we are, putting the rootstock aside and that's it. here we can see that we have about ten shoots to select from the target.
If I waited another month, at least another four, maybe six weeks, instead of dealing with something about half the thickness of a pencil, I would have something twice as thick. They're very thin and narrow and part of the reason they're so thin is because they're all competing with each other for light and they're basically shooting off this very strong growth. What we are going to do and what I am going to do. What we've been doing just before recording this was deciding which one we're going to graft and generally the goal is to find the thickest one, ideally around a pencil, the thickness would be um or even half a pencil, this is closer to about about a quarter of the thickness of a pencil you'll see as we get closer, but the goal is also to design how you want the tree to look.
I'm going to select from these ten, not exactly three, we have three. trees that we are going to graft on it, the others we will reduce and the height, but we will still keep them to encourage greater growth than the ones we select and then the objective is also to design what is the shape and the power and will be the The objective is that every time you do something within your garden, Misuk will predict what the one to five and ten year plan is and the goal is that with any saplings that I graft, I will also have to guide in which direction I want them to grow.
I don't want the branches to grow like they are now. I will band together and compete for the light. The goal is to select which branch will go in which direction and basically direct the branches to grow in an area that will grow. Take advantage of maximum sunlight to support maximum flowering and ultimately support the most fruit. Each one of those leaves is an engine that produces sugars that will ultimately produce the most delicious, tastiest fruits and hopefully everything will be organic. What I have decided here in this garden is that I am going to select a branch on this side that is the farthest corner of the tree when you enter the garden to be a red plum, burgundy plum variety with the contrast in front smaller apricot which has that gold color in the front so it's going to be gold with burgundy behind it and then we're going to make it peachy behind that and I know that as we're going to eventually graft to the top of the graphic and we're going to end up with 10 branches at different levels as we We finally reach the maximum height of this tree which will be between 15 and 20 feet, the color difference probably won't matter as much as it does at this early stage but that's basically the design I'm going for now and I've selected this to be burgundy. , this side is going to be apricot and on the back we are going to do a peach and now we are going to start with that, so I just prepared the site and now it's time for surgery, but let me share with you what I just did here , from this side.
I have installed the variety of apricot that we are going to graft on one of these saplings here, but I already buried it a couple of inches in the ground. I also inserted a stake. If you get a little closer you'll see that I put some nylon thread on it and secured it to the stake to make sure the position of the plant which is again the apricot, we want to make sure it stays in position while we plot the selected branch, so here's a branch of that real apricot that goes to the stem of the plum root so you can see that they are about the same size so this is another useful tip on how to graft similar sized raw wood and basically now we will create the graft union and then we will allow them to begin the healing process starting today.
What we will do first is we will have to remove some of the leaves that are in the area of ​​the position where we are going to graft it but make sure to leave some leaves at the tip so that they can continue doing what these leaves do. the engines to produce both the sugars for the plant and all the proteins that plants need for plant growth and health, and we'll also make sure to leave some leaves on these ends. What we are going to do with the branch is that we do not apply grout and that they are in the area and eventually we will do it with all of them, we are going to prune the tips and that will encourage more root hormones, which are cytokinins, they drive more growth. removing the auxins that are found in higher concentrations near the growing tips, so let's start now with the grafting, as we just said, removing the leaves in the area that we're going to grab, so I'm just going to remove all of these lower leaves from the apricot and again I will leave as many as we can near the tip and now we will do the same on what will become the root stem. and now we have these two areas that we are going to graft again.
I wish this was twice as thick, it would be twice as easy, but again I feel like I'm going to perform microsurgery here and I have. before and we're going to do it again together right now, so what we're going to do next is just use a razor blade like this one here, before we start, make sure you sterilize it. I'm using here my CVS says isopropyl alcohol aka isopropyl alcohol we're just going to disinfect it so I'm just going to rub it to clean it and now when it comes to the cut there's a strategy behind doing this and the goal is to want the Scion wood, which again is the apricot here in the front, rests on the rootstock of this variety of plum, so what we're going to do is cut the rootstock so that it basically supports the wood that we're going to put on top , so hopefully we get here towards some light.
I want to make sure again that we're going to cut right at this point, starting down here and now we just get into the wood and go. to carefully cut it halfway trying to get right to the middle of the stump and ideally for about half an inch, there we're going to stack the cuts and now so these two parts fit together and the goal is to basically line up and Hopefully, you can see this. The goal is to align just below the cortex, this layer of cambium tissue, which is that green layer that underlines the bar.
This layer of cambium tissue needs to be in contact with the cambium now of the apricot, so again I'm going to align. on the two to see where I'm going to make that cut and now we're going to cut the apricot again, the same goal is we're going to cut halfway, a little too thin, I want to get right in the middle, can you look at how flimsy it is , it's barely holding on, but the goal is that hopefully the life from the root will continue to move up the crust and into these two and now we'll line them up together like this, I can tell you from time to time that I make mistakes I feel like this It's a little too thin.
I'm wondering if I should keep this or not, trying to see if there's an alternate branch I can make quickly. It is nearby and it is here, here, here, here. here, so I'm going to start again. I'm going to use this as an alternate branch just because you can see that this one here I have more toward the center. This one I have gone too far and I feel I have a chance of success. now it's less because I lost too much weight, so let me reposition this branch and continue with this graft, so wait a second, so here we are.
I just lined up the two instead of talking about the steps, I'll just focus on getting it done again. I wish it were twice. I think it would be much easier, but you also don't want to use a branch that is more than six months to a year old, as the branch might also be too thick and not ideal for this. Heprocess at this time is flexible, moveable and easy to adjust and they will heal each other quickly so my recommendation is to use branches that are less than a year old on this new growth is ideal.
Simply waiting another month or two would be enough. This process is much easier, but let's start with the goal: again we will be here towards the end of May, if I can't achieve this graft in this cure by the end of June or even early July. I'm going to give it all of July August September October November to grow, hopefully, into about a six to seven foot structure that I'll support next year and that's the kind of urgency behind doing this as soon as possible. anyway let's start again, if I was wrong I would be wrong to cut a little less than half like I did in the first round.
I'm reaching the halfway point right now. I'm going to try to back up, come back towards the center and I think we're done. I'm going to support this branch to make sure it doesn't fall off again being so young and tender and then we're going to snap those two together so securing with my lower hand again is aligning those cambium tissues before we do a perfect job, I'll start wrapping it and I can secure it after I've wrapped it five to ten times and now I just use a little bit of fishing nylon, just one of my favorite threads when grafting because when I open it up to check it in the next few weeks I can quickly see the progress, yeah. the strings are a little long let me cut that shit like I'm doing microsurgery here we go and rap, rap, rap and right now we're doing this loosely let's get a little tighter to make sure they're tight as we wind this a little more and now I'm adding a lot more pressure but not enough to cut the tender outer bark but these two are definitely attached now that you know how the camera zooms and again I can see through the fishing line of nylon that I'm using and now let me secure the knot in place by bringing this up the other end of the rope a little bit closer to where I'm going to put the knot and I'll secure it.
I will share with you what I have done. Now you can see that we basically have the two trees grafted into one and what we're going to do next is make sure that that site stays moist so that will further reduce the stress of what I just did on the two cuttings so it will encourage them. to stay alive while they heal and, as I said, within the next seven to ten days, the vascular tissue, the xylem and the phloem that exist. Within the cambium, the tissues that are exchanged between the two trees will become one and then allow the callus tissue to continue to appear over the next six to eight weeks and we will eventually remove both.
The next thing I would like to do is now. make sure that that spot stays moist, the way we're going to do it is I'm just taking a paper towel here and actually a napkin and I'm just going to add a little bit of water to it like this and I'm going to want to make sure that this spot stays wet and not even I need so much, just enough to wrap it once like this and what we're going to do next now is make sure that that moisture stays there by wrapping it with a plastic bag I have my plastic bag here, I'm just going to shape it into something a little bit smaller and then the goal now is to secure this in place like this and like that, which we're going to do now again with the nylon fishing rope and secure these two ends, let's do that now, so I'm not just securing the bag in place to help retain moisture, it will be reopened in about 10 days and if the underlying napkin shows any signs of rot or replaced, even removed.
After applying the napkin bandage and also inspecting the graft, we can even rinse it a little and then reapply the bandage if we deem necessary, so that the band really only stays on for 10 days, which I'm going to do next and this is. a bit dramatic is that you can see that with the apricot again, this is the apricot tree that is here and you can see that it has also been whitewashed to help keep the trunk of the tree cooler, the nursery did this too, another important point what I want Talking about whitewashing is when it comes to whitewashing and this nursery probably used chemical paint using, you know, basically paint that you would buy at any of the box stores using chemical paint on the outside bark of a tree.
It will only last a very short period of time, for example your epidermis, your skin changes on average every 30 to 60 days, similarly the trunk of your tree will only exist for about a year or two, it will eventually shed its bark. and it will create a new layer of the outer bark, your epidermis, your bark layer, by putting chemical paint on it, which is the paint factories design when painting your house, the goal is the paint is supposed to last for decades, yes not a century, or even more, by putting in a new tree once. that tree sheds its bark and ends up with chemical paint on the ground in practically an eternity, so that's basically the downside and many of the organic gardens across this country are no longer allowed to put chemical paint on their organic produce for the reason that organic fertilizers are used or organic pesticides are not allowed to use chemical paint to whitewash your trees like it was done in previous years, so I just wanted to share that point with you and another benefit is using all the organic Gannicus products now that we have done This, the dramatic thing we have done.
What we are going to do is remove the head of everything on top of the graph. The Apricot Chart. Let's take the head off everything on top of him right now. So I have my pruners here and we're just going to prune. right above this, this is where the apricot branch came off the apricot trunk, we're just going to remove that like this, here's the apricot head and I can see here. I didn't notice this before but you can see that he even used tar as another known way to seal the plant, which again you can use ivory organics products to seal it and again the goal is to prevent wood boring insects and diseases from getting into it by using Ivory Organics products to protect your plants. pests, including beetles and termites, and anything else that can get into your fruit trees, including ornamental trees and roses, it is important to protect yourself from using a tar-based product and using a latex-based product, again, It is designed to last forever and will eventually contaminate the soil.
The other thing for you to use something that is waterproof, like tar and latex, is that it can potentially cause the bottom of the fabrics to rot, which is a lot of research that says don't protect the exposed surfaces because it will rot the other. On the other hand, organic ivory products are latex-free, car-free and do not create a water-impermeable barrier, basically protecting plants again from the summer sun and winter sunburn as well as the three-in-one product with added oils. a rodent and insect repellent protection as well and let me share with you a very quick tour that I did in Griffith Park where there was a plum tree that was pruned about 10 years ago and just checking out all the damage that occurred. to that, let's take a quick look, but I just had to share this tree that is a name here in the park and if you look, this large opening was once a branch that was primitive from the tree at least 10 years ago, possibly even 20 Just I want to show you the damage inside the tree and it is in the process of being burrowed by termites and beetles.
Look at all these holes here and if you get a little closer you can even see the ants that are going in and out of these tunnels and I've seen a lot of these ants transporting eggs and food and all these different particles inside the plant. The reason I bring you here is that I am trying to share the importance of coating. your plant with the Ivy Organics three-in-one tree protection paint product and I will share it with you quickly. Look at this now that we're back here and you'll see again this is the apricot that we've encouraged.
Basically the roots put all their energy into this little piece and eventually the grafted area will shut up about this here is the plum or plum root. We will eventually cut off the top of the plum and then remove the bottom. the apricot so that all the growth comes from the root of the apricot to the selected sawn wood of the apricot and another thing that some of you may ask is how soon will you know if this method is going to work and my answer is within a matter. of days if this top remains alive, healthy and vigorous, I hope it shows new growth because I just removed the head and all this growth, the plant will now immediately stimulate student hormones and again the size of its roots.
They are quite large to support so much leaf and branch matter, all of that is not going to fit into this little twig of a graph, so it will encourage a lot of growth very soon, as long as it stays alive and has not damaged the vascular system. Very bad advice, hopefully you should stay green again. The reason we wrapped it in that water is to keep it alive even more over the next few days and if we can hold on for a few days and stay green it should start expelling it. new growth in the next week or two and that healing process will continue until we have a grafted product that we will share with you in about the next six to eight weeks when we finish these first three fruit salads. tree, so here we are, we finally grafted three varieties of fruit onto the rootstock, the next step is to prune all these remaining shoots that have not been grafted below those graft unions, the goal again is to remove the auxins that are on the growing tips and to encourage the rootstock to invest resources and energy in a sort of Darwinian survival of the fittest, we want the best grafts to get the most light and the most nutrients to basically allow the rootstock to also as The grassroots unions know that I am the best and to make sure that the root does not close its resources to those damaged extremities because I do the graft, as you saw, we cut it at least halfway to encourage a union between the cambium. tissues and we want to make sure that the plants don't reject what we've basically spent all this time and energy and effort to achieve, so again, what we're going to do is basically knock down these other suckers, but we're going to leave them there. in case we need to graft them and in the event that one of these three fails, we will remove the rest of these shoots like this and again we will leave the tips of the ones we grafted, which should be three roots. common tips one, two and three, all the other shoot tips, I'm going to prune them like this and in case you won bail initially in the grafting attempts, don't give up on the plum variety here in front .
For me, um, it actually took me up to three tries until I was finally satisfied with the way I plotted it. If you zoom in a little bit closer, you can see here that it's my first attempt, my second attempt, I cut it a little too much. This wasn't enough wood on the back of the stand basically that it could have worked, but I wasn't satisfied. I created a better Union here and again we are going to unpack all this in about ten days. We're going to check the Remove the paper towel from that bandage and check for some healing and then replace it with a new paper towel and a new bandage and maybe keep it moist for another ten days and then as we see that the curing then we can protect the growth The union with the organic ivory product basically again keeps diseases and pests out of the exposed wood areas.
The other thing I also want to share with you. I've been doing this since I was in 7th grade like I said trying to graft came up on a cactus in 8th grade. I tried grafting roses onto two vines and then in my third year, I was now I don't know 13 or 14 years old and that was the first attempt. Basically, I grafted onto a peach. a small peach seedling that basically produced fruit that did not have the ideal flavor. It was a peach that I got from an ant. Mooney was his name in Pasadena. She gave me that peach tree and a Pawnee that she had successfully grafted and I wish I had taken pictures, but it was a long time ago that I had a peach tree with cherries, plums, apricots, almonds and even other peaches and I had grafted all these varieties of trees Fruit trees of the Prunus type related in that less than ideal flavor in the peach tree and that It gave me a lot of credibility within my church community and that was again the birth of my passion for plants.
I hope you saw my enthusiasm with this and I hope this has sparked more interest as this becomes one of the masterpieces, one of the standout plants in my garden for you toguests and visitors see them when they come to visit my garden. Let me share with you now two other fruit trees within my garden that are more established and that basically everyone started looking for. This you know, it's scientific or I mean, it's a big mess here and I know it seems far from something that will look pleasant one day, but let me share with you what, hopefully, the end result of this will be in the future.
Next month or two, check it out, so here I am now behind our three-in-one apple tree. Here I have an apple tree that is covered in ivory organic matter. Brown. I hope we can do a close-up in a moment. to show you what the brown ivory ganks looks like here and again the brown is my Granny Smith apple variety on this one here on the front with the color ivory genex white is a family favorite since I was in elementary school. I've been grafting and propagating ever since and this one here is a greenish red apple so we went from green Granny Smith apples to a greenish red apple and then to my right there are some red gala apples and take a look here the Granny Smiths just Recently, you know, he started creating some fruits.
If you climb a little higher on the branches, you can see the pinkish-white flowers with the greenish-red apples. You can see there are some small apples that are just starting to form over there and then over here. In what he is painting, the ivory is again green. If you come a little bit closer, look at all these clusters of fruit here to my right and then if you go up a little bit more, these beautiful pinkish white flowers are also still blooming this year. Everything was grafted about three years ago in this area right where my hand is: chart number one, chart number two, and chart number three are somewhere right here, so these were the three things that are here, so These are the three graphene we made and now we are enjoying three apple flavors that are all in one root.
There are some suckers here that we're going to have to remove, but we have a Russo putting out three varieties of apples so some of you can. Ask how you get your fruit trees to produce fruit in such a short time and the answer again is to graft some wood, especially in I did a little research on the plum variety, the peach variety and even the apricot variety on some of those peaches. They have been propagated year after year for more than a hundred years, some of them close to 150 years old, the wood is the same original wood as the parent tree from one hundred and fifty years ago, so the wood is very mature, as they say in gardening. world that wood is ripe if I take an apple here we are now in front of our apple tree and we plant this seed that seed will have to mature just like a child if once you are born it takes a while to reach maturity and interest in reproduction in a similar way , your fruit trees will not flower or produce fruit until they mature, so by grafting you can skip the five ten and even twelve fifteen years it will take for that seedling to mature into something. that will produce fruit, you can skip all that by grafting mature wood and grafting within a year, as we will see in this fig tree, you will see that we will be able to enjoy the fruits within twelve months from the time of grafting, so Another reason to enjoy grafting in his garden.
Some of you might be thinking why go to the trouble of grafting when I can also plant two or three fruit trees of the same type of tree, usually related, you know, three apple trees or three. from the prunus family or two or three varieties of figs or two or three varieties of pomegranates, all in the same hole, although that can work, there are limitations because you don't want to go beyond two or three and also those roots are for the entire life of the The plants will compete with each other for nutrients and basically there will be some competition as one root may dominate the other or two to the detriment of the other two, in this way it is one root, all the leaves and the whole plant, All varieties of apples are working in unison to basically support the roots and the roots similarly support all the branches.
The goal is to basically keep all varieties, as some varieties of apples are more vigorous, under control, so this will be done throughout the pruning process to ensure that each of the three sections receives about a third of the equal amount. of light so that everyone can be successful. Now let's look at the six in one fig, so now here we have this six in one. fig on the tree, we just grafted it last year, this year we are going to enjoy some delicious figs, in general, to give you an idea and you can see that I am pruning and balancing and even here I have a stake to pull this branch here , which is the heavenly purple variety of figs, towards this corner towards you here in the front we have the Chicago Black Heart II to the left of that the green ISA right here in the middle I have the Brown Turkey Fig to my right here is the green Kadota fig and right in front of it I have the tiger fig also known as garbo fig and now let me help you get closer to some fruits that are happening here if you come a little further you can see here this is the first indication of the fruit of fig number one, two, three, if you come back this way in Kadota, there's a fig here on this leaf node, another figure on this leaf node and us.
I can expect figs on practically every leaf of the hood. If I zoom in a little bit closer, we can see here on the brown turkey. We have a fig here. We have another fig down here at this leaf node. where is my finger and here maybe there is another one, you can capture another one, another fig, another thing in this leaf node and here we come to the celestial, this will be a purple variety of fig, there is a figure here in this node and there is another . there's one behind that and the goal is we'll see it in the next month or two and I'll share it with you so again another reason to subscribe if you haven't already is that it's coming to I see six varieties of figs all producing their different colors, all producing their different flavors and all on the same rootstock in this example.
This is another reason why I would never dare try to put six Briah fig teas in a hole, which would be too much competition. to understand three, understand maybe even four, but how is it possible to achieve six? And the goal is to hopefully add a few more flavors before the end of this year, so this is a great example to get grafted into your garden so you can enjoy. a whole variety of salad fruit trees, all in a reasonable space in your garden without having to plant six fig trees and take up hundreds of square feet of your garden instead of just limited space for a single tree, another reason to graft another thing well we are still here in the garden this here being the heavenly fig it was one of the last figs that we had grafted let me share with you this graft union if you come a little further down you will see the cracks that still exist between the rootstock that is here to me left and then the heavenly fig that is here closest to me on my right.
This graft between the two has a lot of exposed wood and a perfect hiding place for many pests and even diseases. hide, what we're going to do now is just take the cyber protection of three animals and plants from sunburned insects and rodents and we're basically going to do this gardening concept known as whitewashing again to seal it in. This was originally made in white and I have this brown can open and ready so we're just going to use Brown and the goal is to fill in all of these cracks and crevices inside the fig and keep it sealed and again like we saw in Griffith Park.
Regarding pruning and branching, you can see that we covered the pruning branch. This will still take several more years to close. We want to make sure it doesn't get exposed to the elements, so here we are again. now it was coated white probably about six or eight months ago and we're going to reapply another seal to keep it protected here we are now at the end of May throughout the spring and summer and throughout the fall and it will take us even through the winter as This product lasts on average about a year from its application, depending on the amount of rain and water to which the product is exposed.
I hope you found this video informative and educational and if so please don't forget to like us and most importantly by subscribing below you will be connected to this and all our other educational gardening videos. Thanks again for watching, happy gardening and another quick reminder. Don't forget to miss us on our live, our first live YouTube video. This will happen on June 16th at 8:05am PST, based again here in Los Angeles, California where we will be launching our new all-purpose organic fertilizer that is unlike anything else on the market. an extremely educational moment presented by our very organic soap, so make sure you don't miss that live event again on June 16 at 8:05 a.m. m. and we are here to help you make this the best growing season of your life.
Thanks again for watching and happy. gardening

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