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5 Small Maintenance Jobs Often Missed On Your Vintage Honda Motorcycle

Jun 09, 2021
Hey guys, I'm Caleb with Stock Engine and today we're going to talk about five

often

overlooked

maintenance

jobs

on

your

older Honda, how to perform them, and some tips and tricks along the way, Symptoms of a Poorly Adjusted Rear Brake also. Tighten and you'll find

your

brakes locking into a fishtail. Too loose and you'll find yourself running into braking distance. The first adjustment is the height of the rear brake pedal. There's no right answer, but you really just want to make sure your foot is resting in a comfortable place, loosen the rear brake pedal adjusting screw lock and turn it clockwise or counterclockwise. clockwise until you reach the proper height, tighten the locknut again to set it.
5 small maintenance jobs often missed on your vintage honda motorcycle
Your adjustment screw may differ from ours on the cb350. you can find it just below. Next, we're going to set up the rear brake travel. Notice how our brake pedal only moves about half an inch in travel before locking the rear brake. That's too tight. Modern bicycles use ABS systems to apply it gradually. braking force to avoid stalling, we don't have that luxury, but increasing rear brake travel increases the range in which you can apply them, giving you a longer, safer distance to quickly apply the brakes in an emergency situation, move to the rear of your

motorcycle

and you will find the rear brake adjusting nut.
5 small maintenance jobs often missed on your vintage honda motorcycle

More Interesting Facts About,

5 small maintenance jobs often missed on your vintage honda motorcycle...

Loosen this nut to loosen the brake pedal and provide more travel, tighten it to get the reverse effect if you find you are running out of threads or have too many, loosen the bolt holding your brake pivot arm to the splined shaft and move it a few notches forward or backward; Your threaded rod should actually sit right on the rear edge of the pivot arm when fully released. Honda expects its rear brake arm to travel between 0.8 and 1.2 inches of travel or If you're not in the US, 20 to 30 millimeters, nothing is more appreciated than a functional gas cap after too many gas leaks on your nice paint job and those nice new pants notice how you can't see the seal on this blue cb 360 tank.
5 small maintenance jobs often missed on your vintage honda motorcycle
Too bad, but by the time we start taking it off you'll see how fragile the rubber was. Remove the old seal. Clean any corrosion or rust from the gas space with a wire brush. Carefully stretch the new seal over the top. You want to make sure the thin side is facing the inside of the gas cap, it will definitely take longer than you think to get it in there. One more thing worth mentioning is that if you lose your gas cap key, they are not actually connected to that key, just about anything will unlock that bad boy, we usually see the petcock being swings in two different directions, or it's clogged and not letting enough gas through, or it has a damaged filter screen inside that's letting a lot of other things through, the proper solution is not to put a set of inline filters in there, but actually just keep going, Clean and rebuild that petcock if you need to start by draining the gas tank and removing the petcock so you can open it and inspect it.
5 small maintenance jobs often missed on your vintage honda motorcycle
Its pieces consist of the main one. mounting nut petcock body sediment bowl lever wave washer face plate and mounting screws main filter lever o-ring tank o-ring to petcock and sediment bowl o-ring this

small

filter of mesh you see in our stock line is almost always missing on an original petcock, don't worry if yours is missing, you still have your actual filter inside the body of the petcak, clean all parts thoroughly before reassembling, If your O-rings or filter need to be replaced, we sell O-ring filter kits as well as orifice replacement. Petcocks for all

motorcycle

s we support When reassembling your petcock, be sure not to pinch the wave washer between the petcock body and the faceplate so that there are no leaks.
Also, the large nut is installed back onto the petcock with the smooth side facing up that you want to screw on. this back into the petcock counterclockwise with just a half turn, don't screw it on any more than that when you go to screw the petcock back into the tank, hold the petcock in place and Simply twist the large nut which is designed for both sides to open. thread the nut which is equally located in the middle and the top onto the o-ring, it just needs to be tight, do not overtighten it, the brass fuel line nipples may come off the petcock body with a few taps on the copper. or a plastic mallet seats them back in and that's all you need to do;
You may not even know they were on your bike, they dampen road vibrations on the handlebars and if they are old and worn like these, they can create dangerous handling. Condition: Loosen the four 12 millimeter bolts holding the handlebar in place and push them out of the way. A nut on the bottom of each handlebar riser allows them to slide out so you can access the bushings. Our set of four handlebar caps replaces the top part. and bottom bushings on both risers and are also made of higher quality polyurethane than the factory rubber so they will stiffen the bars for better handling and will last forever two things to remember one if you have the ground wire that It goes to the handlebar.
Don't forget to put them back. The handlebar clamps are actually asymmetrical and should be installed with a

small

point facing forward and tighten the front riser bolts before the rear ones. You'll know you installed them correctly if you end up with a small gap in the back like you see here, this is another easy part that you may not notice while working on your exhaust pipes. Old, leaking copper and composite exhaust gaskets can wreak havoc on your motorcycle's operating condition. Unscrew the 12 millimeter gauge. nuts on each exhaust flange and the few mounting nuts that are on the back of the mufflers and their pipe should come out into your engine their gaskets can be a little hard to see they are

often

covered in carbon and you will need to clean and scrape a little so you can see where they are, take out the old copper and composite exhaust gaskets with a small flat blade screwdriver and put a new one on when you put the exhaust collars and flange back together, make sure you have the curved side facing the exhaust flange, as you can see us doing here.
The thin side should face the engine and push the tube into the gasket. If you are missing an exhaust collar, we have replacements available last when you tighten the nuts. Don't overtighten them here, just tighten them up, the copper and composite exhaust gaskets crush when you tighten the exhaust flange and they flatten and snap together providing a tight seal, squash them too much and you'll end up with leaky pipes again, do this good. In fact, you can even reuse them three or four times. Okay guys, that's going to be five

maintenance

jobs

that we often see people miss on their older Hondas.
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